Undercover Muslim: A Journey into Yemen


And worst the characters just talk whatever and whenever they feel like. The ending is not an ending actually but maybe he just decided to leave it at that. The main reason that i feel that this book was written was to reimburse his travel expenses. And i got suckered. So people please do not encourage book's like these that are very misleading in their title and content.

  1. Undercover Muslim, A Journey into Yemen by Theo Padnos;
  2. Higher Education as a Field of Study in China: Defining Knowledge and Curriculum Structure (Emerging Perspectives on Education in China)!
  3. Make informed decisions with the FT..
  4. Ever Present Danger (Phantom Hollow Series)!
  5. Undercover Muslim: A Journey into Yemen by Theo Padnos.

If you really want to read a decent travelogue please read Atish taseer's book, it more than makes up for the title and is a very honest book. As they say any monkey with a camera thinks he is a photographer. Now we got to add another one "Any guy with a beard ain't no searcher for green truth" Dec 04, Daniel rated it liked it Shelves: It's a good, interesting, easy read that gives more insight into modern life in Yemen and into the life of naive Muslim converts, than into the extremist Salafism that the blurb implies.

But his eventual observations of the unspoken things of male-dominated Muslim society are worthy and perceptive.

Undercover Muslim A Journey into Yemen

The blurb promises the background on how an al Qaeda friendly Yemeni village got bombed, which spurred on the 'shoe bomber' who caused millions of people frustrating at every US airport even today - It's a good, interesting, easy read that gives more insight into modern life in Yemen and into the life of naive Muslim converts, than into the extremist Salafism that the blurb implies.

The blurb promises the background on how an al Qaeda friendly Yemeni village got bombed, which spurred on the 'shoe bomber' who caused millions of people frustrating at every US airport even today - but the text of book literally does not even mention either of those events.

I've read other stuff about Yemen in the 90s- so this is fascinating about Sanaa and the Dammaj valley in the s. His final conclusion is it's disorganized therefore no one is training to fight jihad or become a terrorist Does not seem to be a rigorous assessment of this issue.

Choose the subscription that is right for you

Oct 04, Sally rated it really liked it. Markets Show more Markets links. What is the USP not clear and we get to know that the author has converted without any reason. Published July 14th by Bodley Head first published July 1st As they say any monkey with a camera thinks he is a photographer. Indeed, there is some doubt as to the genuineness of his conversion: And i got suckered.

He makes it sound premeditated but I can't shake the impression that he really believed in it as he lived as a naive Muslim convert. If you're interested in these topics it's worth a read- this is the same guy who was later held hostage by Al-Nusra Front in Syria, and written up in the New Yorker article on Islamic State hostages and their families.

I think if I met him I'd get along with him really well, while getting annoyed at the idealism that thinks an American dude faking Salafist Islam is the way to save other salafists from becoming terrorists that is literally the rationale he explains early on.

Full FT.com access for your team or business

Oh and another factor was he had to leave America because he couldn't stand another term of George W Bush Oct 04, Sally rated it really liked it. While teaching English in a prison in Vermont, he became interested in the American Taliban, John Lindh, and decided to leave what seemed like a pointless job. They would be Muslim searchers like Lindh, and their roads would be the high altitude footpaths of the Islamic world. I would meet them before they had committed any crimes, when they were just mulling things over in their minds.

How best to live?

Undercover Muslim

I would listen to their discussions, take notes and if they asked for my advice, i would give it. Here we read of the other students, many of them European, and their motivations and feelings. One thing that was never clarified were the author's own feelings on Islam. Was the whole thing just a means of going undercover or was he left with at least some belief in the religion? I veered between positive and negative feelings towards the Muslims in this book. Gave me a great impression of Yemen: Nov 25, Robin rated it it was amazing.

Theo Padnos writes amazing well; he takes his reader on a journey and keeps us -- long after the book is finished. He takes us to the middle east where so little is understood these days and give the reader a better understanding of that world. Cleo rated it it was amazing Apr 23, Corey Beck rated it it was ok Apr 14, Paul Corbul rated it liked it Aug 23, Mirwat Hussain rated it it was ok Sep 25, Jul 25, Stevie rated it did not like it.

Rambling nonsense by a total weird-piece!

Book review: Undercover Muslim: A Journey into Yemen

Bea rated it liked it Mar 14, Feb 22, Sharon Beck added it. He shows a side of Yemen that would not be seen in tourist books or on websites. Very interesting and honest.

  • Undercover Muslim: A Journey into Yemen.
  • Document Preview;
  • ?

Maude Bardet rated it liked it Oct 23, Mark Baldwin rated it really liked it Sep 11, Ira rated it liked it Dec 25, Christine rated it liked it Mar 04, Roxanne rated it really liked it Jan 11, Jeannine rated it liked it Nov 14, Rob Gleich rated it did not like it Sep 01, Rich rated it it was ok Mar 15, Philip Cockerill rated it liked it Jun 01, Yasmeen Naseer rated it really liked it Jan 28, Stay informed and spot emerging risks and opportunities with independent global reporting, expert commentary and analysis you can trust.

Accessibility help Skip to navigation Skip to content Skip to footer.

Share this title

Make informed decisions with the FT. Choose the subscription that is right for you. For 4 weeks receive unlimited Premium digital access to the FT's trusted, award-winning business news. Never worry about missing out on our essential news and trusted opinion. Unlimited digital access to everything we publish — all the essentials plus deeper insights and unrivalled analysis.

See a Problem?

Undercover Muslim: A Journey into Yemen [Theo Padnos] on domaine-solitude.com * FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. In December the US government. Undercover Muslim by Theo Padnos. In December the US government launched an air strike against the tiny Yemeni villa.

All the benefits of Digital plus: Unlimited digital access plus the FT Newspaper delivered to your door. All the benefits of Premium plus: