THE ECONOMISTS DAUGHTER: Poems by Elizabeth Cohen

The House on Beartown Road: A Memoir of Learning and Forgetting

With your foot extending from your rolled-up pants, you touch the edge of the known. In the end everything is one. In some small way you meet this fact each day. Either was asked what it thought about Or and it took awhile, almost a week, but Either finally admitted it needed Or when it came to a fork in the road or when the first snows came rushing in breathlessly, bleaching the lawn and there were decisions to be made about the cattle. If was tentative when it first encountered Then but If finally realized it needed Then to answer those big dark questions that come in the night, to lie beside it, to make the biggest promises, and, of course, for science projects.

So much of the time it is like pollen floating into, out of a life, away from a city, toward the coast, back to the mountains, up to the moon, planting a flag there and leaving behind expensive junk. There are those who have wondered if it is mammalian or reptilian. To them we must point out: It does not bear its young live. Once, in a small city in Spain, a woman wanted to help her brother.

To get that she would need twenty seven pesetas. She had nobody to go to for them but that same brother, the one who needed work. The world has broken open for the lack of it, it has collapsed and peeled back and then, attaining it, empired and colonialized gone war mongering, invented new diseases. A man who won the lottery last week decided to give it all to a library near his home so they could buy computers that the people there could use to search for work.

He was interviewed by a newspaper reporter whom he told he knew it, instinctively, what he would do, it was like it had been stitched onto his bones at birth: When you are tired of the vagaries of highways, the vanities of buildings, jetstreams that criss-cross the cerulean sky. The waltzing of the presidents, the parry of governments, the closed gates of the shoelace factory. It is simple, really, the world. Just as they had gotten settled Elizabeth's Mother calls her and tells her she needs to Come and pick Up Her father.

He's doing things that aren't normal And she can't handle him For anyone Struggling with a family member with Alzheimer's, this is s great read. He's doing things that aren't normal And she can't handle him Elizabeth's husband has left her, daddy moves in. She finds herself in the 'Sandwich generation ' This is funny yet sad Especially if you've had experience with Alzheimer's Nov 14, Kristin rated it it was amazing.

Just loved this beautiful memoir of a year spent as a single mom to a baby and a solo caretaker to a father with Alzheimer's. Most people would have just seen the drudgery of constant caretaking and trying to manage the basics of life, or been consumed by their bitterness. But this author turned ordinary life into poetry. Aug 11, Alexa rated it really liked it. Chose this title because it was written by a local author, about our area, and it's a memoir, which I really enjoy. Read this in bigger gulps - I could empathize with her journey as a mother and about those cold, cold winters.

Aug 19, Sarah rated it really liked it. Mar 23, Carina Langstraat rated it really liked it Shelves: A 40 year old journalist finds herself caring for her 1 year old daughter and her Alzheimers father simultaneously. Particularly loved the spectrum of her changing perspective from beginning to end. You never stop hoping, you never know for sure. One of the worst things about dementia is that one forgets the present but somehow one manages to bring past events to the surface without too much difficulty except that this is very repetitive.

If you have cared for a loved one with short term memory, it is very exhausting until you realize that this is as good as it gets. Because it's an uphill climb to the finish line once a loved one has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and Elizabeth come You never stop hoping, you never know for sure.

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Because it's an uphill climb to the finish line once a loved one has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and Elizabeth comes to realize that there is peace in forgetting and that there is an elegant grace to it. You can focus on the present moment and let everything else fade away. Elizabeth's story of her father's declining mental health is a powerful story because Elizabeth has taken the power to make a difference in her father's life. When most of her family gave up on the situation, Elizabeth took it upon herself to make a difference.

Not everyone one of us is capable of self sacrificing their life and putting their dreams on hold.

The Economist's Daughter (Poetry Series): Elizabeth Cohen: domaine-solitude.com: Books

Her husband left her with a newborn little girl, Ava and a very old farm house that they had just recently purchased.. Elizabeth was faced with many challenges all at once. The first winter in this very old farm house had not been assessed with it's potential challenges. No wood, no generator, no cupboards full. It was one challenge after another. Elizabeth and her daughter Ava grew up together, facing daily challenges in addition to the challenges of keeping her father Sanford out of his own way. I summarize with a quote from Elizabeth at the end of her memoir. Eventually we all become memories.

All we have for sure is this moment now and whatever we can summon in our hearts and minds about moment's past". Jul 22, Barbara Burd rated it liked it Recommends it for: I picked up this book at ALA because I recognized the setting on Beartown Road and the Binghamton area, having lived in the area for many years.

Cohen presents a very true picture, sometimes lovely and sometimes terrible, of being a single mother responsible for the care of a baby and an aging father with Alzheimer's. The sweetest moments were the relationship between the baby and the father as their lives and intelligences intersect in the process of learning and forgetting. Cohen writes with a I picked up this book at ALA because I recognized the setting on Beartown Road and the Binghamton area, having lived in the area for many years.

Cohen writes with a brutal honesty about her own feelings of helplessness and frustration. I was struck by the care given to her by neighbors and strangers. I've felt that living in the northeast with its severe winters makes one hardy, but it also makes one sensitive to the needs of others and this was evident throughout the book.

The book is a tribute to the wonderful people of the Southern tier. As our society ages, the plight of aging parents will only become more prevalent and this book serves as a precursor to the issues that many of us will face. Dec 15, Sara rated it liked it Shelves: This book shows a beautiful picture of the different stages of life. A forty years old taking care of her newborn daughter AVA and her eighty years old father in mid stages of Alzheimer disease. I have so many favorite quotes from this book, but here is one at the very beginning of the book that is most memorable: She said "Mama" on the same day he first asked me who I wa This book shows a beautiful picture of the different stages of life.

She said "Mama" on the same day he first asked me who I was. She said "Baby Aba" the same week we received our census and my father looked for a long time at the form before asking me his own name.

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Feb 04, Tamara Murphy rated it liked it. A well written memoir -- both poignant and funny. The author is one of my favorite columnists from our hometown newspaper. While it didn't do much for my historical understanding of the place that raised me, it did remind me that I come from such a small place that I actually knew almost everyone Ms. Cohen referenced in this book. Anyway, that's not the point of the book.

Except it is -- the neighborliness of small town folk plays a major redemptive role in this story and is one of the attribute A well written memoir -- both poignant and funny. Except it is -- the neighborliness of small town folk plays a major redemptive role in this story and is one of the attributes I hope to take with me no matter where I go from here. Cohen has done the same. May 17, Jonah rated it really liked it Shelves: I laughed and I cried and I read bits out loud to my family. I think this is a well written book, and I also admire how kind the author is to her subjects in her writing.

I didn't really identify with the author; I am long past being upset by an inability to remember nouns on command. And her understanding of genetics is poor enough that she refers to a "gene called chromosome 21". But science isn't much of this book. If you want to read a kind, honest, and even humorous look into the life of some I laughed and I cried and I read bits out loud to my family.

If you want to read a kind, honest, and even humorous look into the life of somebody living in the country with a demented father, infant daughter, and absent husband, this is a good one. I am almost done this this memoir and I have really enjoyed Ms. Cohen's voice and story-telling. It is hard to imagine the day to day struggles that she and so many go through everyday as caregivers to parents with Alzheimer's. When I first started it, I was wary, thinking it was going to be a tear-jerker, and while I shed a tear here and there, she also made me laugh and think.

The way that she compares her daughter's accumulation of everyday skills to her father's daily losses is bittersweet and I am almost done this this memoir and I have really enjoyed Ms. The way that she compares her daughter's accumulation of everyday skills to her father's daily losses is bittersweet and fascinating at the same time. This is a beautifully told memoir of a bleak winter in North America when Elizabeth Cohen, a year old newspaper columnist, was left alone to care for her baby daughter and her elderly father who has Alzheimer's.

It captures the grit and determination she needed, the joy of small successes, and the triumph of love over adversity. It was recommended to me by someone working in the field of dementia care; I recommend it to anyone. None of us know when we might face problems within our families l This is a beautifully told memoir of a bleak winter in North America when Elizabeth Cohen, a year old newspaper columnist, was left alone to care for her baby daughter and her elderly father who has Alzheimer's.

None of us know when we might face problems within our families like this. New to the experience myself I'm humbled by the way she coped with far more responsibility than I have. Apr 20, Bob rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Any one in the "Sandwich Generation". Elizabeth Cohen is forty and raising her infant daughter Ava when her father, Sanford Cohen, a noted economics professor and author, comes to live with her. He is eighty, and in the mid-stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

This a touching memoir which sugar coats nothing. For a reader, such as myself, who has just reached sixty, and who has dealt with the aging and death of his own parents, and is now trying to be supportive to his in-laws who are falling into that aging pattern, it touched some tende Elizabeth Cohen is forty and raising her infant daughter Ava when her father, Sanford Cohen, a noted economics professor and author, comes to live with her.

For a reader, such as myself, who has just reached sixty, and who has dealt with the aging and death of his own parents, and is now trying to be supportive to his in-laws who are falling into that aging pattern, it touched some tender spots. To say nothing of the that I'm getting close to those senile years myself. Jul 08, Cheryl rated it really liked it Recommended to Cheryl by: This is a wonderful touching book about a woman who is raising her 1 year old daughter while at the same time caring for her father who is suffering from "Alzenheimers" as he calls it.

Great parallels to the circle of life from where we began to where we sometimes end. The book is effective without being overly sentimental and sloppy - somewhat of a third person point of view written from a first person perspective. It stays with you after you close the last page which to me always says a lot ab This is a wonderful touching book about a woman who is raising her 1 year old daughter while at the same time caring for her father who is suffering from "Alzenheimers" as he calls it.

It stays with you after you close the last page which to me always says a lot about a book. Dec 10, Richard Jespers rated it really liked it. Her baby is one year old. Heart-breaking but never sentimental.

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domaine-solitude.com: THE ECONOMIST'S DAUGHTER: Poems by Elizabeth Cohen eBook: ELIZABETH COHEN: Kindle Store. The Economist's Daughter has 2 ratings and 1 review. In The Economist's Daughter, Elizabeth Cohen offers poems of breathtaking clarity.

All three books cover the disease differently. But all three point out that AD is a coast-to-coast train wreck about to happen.

Editorial Reviews

Mar 21, Susan rated it really liked it. This is a book everyone should read. How difficult for Elizabeth to suddenly be a single mother of a one year old, and care giver of her 80 year old father. One year old Ava, thirsty for knowledge and exploring everything, while the 80 year old can't remember who Elizabeth is or even who he is.

A Memoir of Love and Courage

Read more Read less. Cohen, the sole breadwinner, cook, and bottle washer, quickly slips into survival mode, which mostly entails struggling to keep her infant child and aging father from hurting themselves. If you want to read a kind, honest, and even humorous look into the life of somebody living in the country with a demented father, infant daughter, and absent husband, this is a good one. Suddenly alone with a one-year-old and an year-old, and with winter imminent, Cohen is rapidly overwhelmed by her reconfigured family, much like her isolated house becomes imprisoned by the mounting snowdrifts. From the first page to the last, one is reminded of the contract life makes between the material body of the world and the soul.

Sometimes humorous,sometimes sad, there is a definite bond between these three people. Elizabeth Cohen gives the reader an understanding of what it means to care for a loved one with Alzheimer's. To say t This is a book everyone should read. To say the least, even without a young child thrown into the mix, a day to day challenge. This is a wonderful touching memoir of the year when Elizabeth Cohen was 40 years old, her father 80 and her daughter 0.

Stanford Cohen was a brilliant economist but now has Alzheimer's and he is passed from his wife to one daughter, then to the other, then all over again. Elizabeth's husband walked out on his family just before his father-in-law came to live with them. She tells the ups and downs of her life in beautiful words that made me want to be a neighbor on Beart This is a wonderful touching memoir of the year when Elizabeth Cohen was 40 years old, her father 80 and her daughter 0.

The Family on Beartown Road

She tells the ups and downs of her life in beautiful words that made me want to be a neighbor on Beartown Road and read her column in the Binghamton Press and Sun-Bulletin. I'm as fascinated as the author by the way her daughter seems to pick up the pieces of language that the author's father is dropping.

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Her father has come to live with her because her mother can no longer deal with his progressing Alzheimer's disease. Beth is 40, her father is 80 and her daughter is 0 at the beginning of the book. She says she journals at night until she makes her worries and frustrations beautiful. Cohen's use of language is almost poetic. Her father's descriptions of objects wh I'm as fascinated as the author by the way her daughter seems to pick up the pieces of language that the author's father is dropping.

Her father's descriptions of objects whose name he has forgotten ARE poetic. Nov 30, Henrietta rated it it was amazing. Really liked this book. Loved that she struggled through but finally read her father's book. I want to know what's happening on Beartown Road today. Is her father still living. Wonder if she and Shane stayed together. Ava would be about six or seven.