Recits des Hommes Seuls (French Edition)

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The man was born there 50 years ago and has never once set foot on His name is Alone.

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The man was born there 50 years ago and has never once set foot on land. Did I hire a sailor or a social worker? The captain hired an assistant with a past as mysterious as the man in the lighthouse, and the assistant unknowingly sets off a chain of events by leaving a note for the lighthouse inhabitant whom no one living has ever seen.

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I picked up this graphic novel because I was intrigued by the beautiful cover and the description of the story which on the surface is a simple one. But there are depths to it like the ocean surrounding the lighthouse, with ripples that reach out to the reader, especially anyone seemingly stuck where they are in life.

The black and white graphics are bold and sometimes bleak, adding atmosphere and dimension to the story which had me tensing toward the end. Written and illustrated by a renowned French artist, this graphic novel kept me riveted and left an impression. View all 10 comments. This is a graphic novel - a novel that a lot of work went into. It is all in black and white. It has very few words, but tells a sad, sad story, ultimately ending well. This is translated from French and regarded as Chaboute's masterpiece.

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The story tells of a man - a hermit, that no one has ever seen - who lives in a lighthouse way out to sea, on just an outcropping of rock. He was born in that lighthouse. Now 50 years later he has been the sole inhabitant for the last 5 stars What a great book. Now 50 years later he has been the sole inhabitant for the last 15 years, since losing his parents. He gets supplies delivered weekly, however he hides while that boat is there. Once that boat takes on an ex-convict as the crew things begin to change.

This is pages of very little words and a story well told in pictures. The pictures speak to you and you feel his isolation and his fears. This is an author that I definitely will read again. View all 7 comments. I don't read graphic novels too often, so when this one showed up on my doorstep courtesy of the publisher not sponsored, not obligated to review I was intrigued.

I was even more intrigued when I found out it was translated from French, and told almost entirely in illustrations. There is a bit of dialogue, but not much; so little, in fact, that you can probably read this nearly page book in less than an hour. I thought the drawings were evocative and showcased the characters' feelings reall I don't read graphic novels too often, so when this one showed up on my doorstep courtesy of the publisher not sponsored, not obligated to review I was intrigued.

I thought the drawings were evocative and showcased the characters' feelings really well. I was a bit unsure about the representation in this book, mainly of the character with a physical disfigurement.

It is an empowering and hopeful story, but mainly read to me as a bit dated and old hat. If you're looking for something new to try, I'd recommend checking this out for a quick read. Breathtaking Black and white aloneness A story in pictures Slices of feeling Picture: A quiet, gut-wrenching masterpiece. View all 4 comments. This graphic novel is simply remarkable.

There is almost no text, but the story is so powerful, that it speaks for itself. A door stopper that I could have read in an hour or less. The dialogue was minimal even for a graphic novel. There's some dialogue in this story, but very little. Mostly, it's pictorial tale, illustrated simply, strongly, beautifully. There's an automated lighthouse out in the ocean but every week, a guy drops off two boxes of supplies down at the lighthouse dock. When his employee, a new hire, asks why, the captain of the boat explains that a man lives in that lighthouse, all alone in the 15 years since his father died.

The new sailor asks why the alone man doesn't just leave and the captain then expla There's some dialogue in this story, but very little. The new sailor asks why the alone man doesn't just leave and the captain then explains that the guy is horribly disfigured and the parents had never let him set foot on land so he's spent his entire life in the lighthouse and on the surrounding rock. It's been some years. He's clever, coming up with ways to entertain and stimulate his mind. He has a collection of treasures washed up from the sea and they're enough to give him opening into the larger world, but not an opening large enough that he feels he can enter that world.

It takes a question from a stranger and a gossip magazine to make him realize there's so much more beyond his island and the treasure-bringing sea. I loved all the emotions I got reading this story.

Folie dansante, hilarité irrépressible et nonnes possédées : histoires d'hystéries collectives

The lighthouse dweller, isolated his entire life, is childlike in his awareness of the world. He imagines a podiatrist measuring human feet, the feet of tables and chairs, the bases of lamps because his lack of experience creates a lack of context. He has created a tidy existence for himself and his one friend, another gift from the water.

Perhaps not knowing what he's missing - I'd say freedom but it's not so much that he's not free, more that he isn't aware of the possibility of stepping beyond his environment - makes him not bitter, not aggrieved, not yearn for everything beyond his doorstep. Because all that lies beyond his doorstep is saltwater and, once a week, a boat from which he hides. But no one can live without connection and he makes do until he can't anymore. It's a sad story, sort of, but also graceful and uplifting.

I really liked it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Ako ovo nije najtuznija prica ikad nacrtana, onda je barem u samom vrhu. Kadrovi su predivni i isto toliko usamljeni i tuzni. Jedna stolica, jedna casa, jedan tanjur, jedna vilica, jedan tragican lik, na prozoru naslagane stvarcice koje pripadaju nekim drugim zivotima, a koje su slucajno doplutale Jedna ribica, jedan rjecnik i nevjerojatna snaga maste. Jedan krevet i rutina Jedan slucajni, empaticni prolaznik i jedna mozda mala nada. Slomio me sa svim svojim detaljima.

But this story soon takes a positive turn as the hermit in the lighthouse fantastic metaphor! Although this book is huge, it reads quickly. The majority of the panels are wordless. A ship makes a delivery to a lighthouse on an island just barely large enough to hold it. The captain tells his shipmate that, even though the lighthouse is automated. The son of the former caretakers lives there. Born deformed, he shuns human company, and hasn't been seen in years.

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We, the readers, do get to see the island's sole inhabitant and how he spends his days The cover makes this seem like a more g Although this book is huge, it reads quickly. The cover makes this seem like a more grim and bleak tale than it turns out to be. Alone is warm, whimsical, and human.

Histoire extraordinaire de Pierre Bellemare - piège pour un homme seul

Many of the panels feature moment to moment transitions which give the effect of slow pans and zooms. The pacing is leisurely, but never lethargic. This whole book feels like some forgotten classic of French cinema, perhaps something from the 70's or 80's. It's not strongly set in any particular era. It made me smile and warmed my heart, which is no mean feat for a graphic novel.

Sep 26, Nick rated it really liked it Shelves: Tout Seul or All Alone en anglais looks at a freakishly disfigured man who's spent his entire life in a lighthouse on a tiny rock of land in the ocean. The man, pre-deceased by his parents for many years, and also nick-named 'Tout Seul,' spends his days fishing and playing a game where he throws a giant dictionary -- his only book -- on his table, and then chooses a word 'at random' to learn or ponder.

His only contact with the outside world is via food packages regularly deposited at the ligh Tout Seul or All Alone en anglais looks at a freakishly disfigured man who's spent his entire life in a lighthouse on a tiny rock of land in the ocean. His only contact with the outside world is via food packages regularly deposited at the lighthouse dock by a side-character fisherman who made a promise to Tout Seul's dying father.

Tout Seul is drawn entirely in black and white, and has minimal text and many long, slow, progressive sections, where Chaboute plays with scale and perspective. A seagull is drawn as a far off speck, then a smudge, then an outline of some sort of bird, then a soaring gull, panel by panel. Chaboute uses plot devices external to the lighthouse to bring it perspective, by having us watch the seagull watching the lighthouse as it flies higher and higher in each panel, or by having the fishing boat arrive and depart with glimpses of Tout Seul fishing in the far background and his absence as the boat docks.

Chaboute also uses Tout Seul's imagination and dictionary game to move the plot along, make the story more interesting and expansive, and, surely, to practice artistic liberty. It seems reasonable to assume that most of Tout Seul's knowledge of the external world comes from his giant dictionary, and the rest comes from scraps of items, memories and teachings left by his parents.

Because of his extreme isolation, disfigurement, and other factors, he has never needed to grow up fully, and his imagination remains as fresh as a child's.

Tout Seul's creative power conjures up many fantastic scenes based on each new word he learns, or re-visits from the dictionary. The imaginings are logically-flawed visual representations of the word, because Tout Seul lacks the context most of us possess: I find some of Tout Seul's 'random' word choices all-too convenient however. For example, after pages and pages of him going through virtually the same routine and of virtually nothing new happening in the book, suddenly Tout Seul opens his book to "loneliness" or "prison," and then reacts as if he's never conceived of these notions in his life, and as if his world, as he knows it is crumbling.

That's not to say that the reactions aren't appropriate and powerful if indeed he's just discovered the words, and I suppose it's believable that he's never stumbled on these concepts before, given a theoretical rate of words learned per day and the massive size of the dictionary. Moreover, of course Chaboute has to do something with the plot to move it along That said, I'm not sure how Chaboute could have done it differently and still had such a rare and interesting plot.

Tout Seul is a fine book, which may make you think, and may almost break your heart. A stationary stone ship A granite boat that doesn't pitch That takes us nowhere That never docks Onboard this lighthouse, we'll never get ashore A beautiful French graphic novel that was not nearly as depressing as I thought it would be. Feedback If you need help or have a question for Customer Service, contact us. Would you like to report poor quality or formatting in this book?

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