Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: AND A True Life of Slavery (Penguin Classics)


Three years later, as a sophomore in college, I was asked to read the book again for my class on Black Thought and Literature. I wish that I had taken the time to slow down and analyze Frederick Douglass' narrative from a literal, analytical, and figurative perspective. The emotion and conviction with which the author writes is not only poetic and moving, but captivating as well.

The imagery, combined with Douglass' views on religion's role in the enslavement of black bodies, masterfully paints a story that in combination with other narratives has, unfortunately, been lost throughout time. In fact, many Black writers during this period refused to publish their experiences for fear that they will be caught and returned to slavery.

In other cases, some writers used pen names to add some anonymity to their experiences. Nevertheless, such works should be cherished and valued; for they allow us to gain a better understanding of how far our society has come, and how much more needs to be done to ensure a future where everyone is equal in the truest sense of the word. This is the edition close to the original. Be careful as many other editions are out with additional opinions by modern "interpreters".

This book, from the original author, needs no added opinions or editorials. Still quite a moving read more than years after it was written. I am not yet 50 years old, yet I have seen in my own lifetime the unreasonable attitude that has somehow been passed down over time to this generation. Several times, I have seen my very own friends mistreated because they are black. It stems from a lack of compassion, grown out of fear or ignorance.

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

I recommend this book as a most important read for our adolescent children, no matter what their racial or cultural surroundings have taught them. To enslave is to be immoral. I had read this story once before. The scenes seemed familiar, but didn't recognize it until I was partway through the book. Once my memory was jogged, I decided to finish the book because I knew I'd enjoy it again.

Really, it's hard to imagine hiding away in a cramped space for seven years. Obviously, the alternative was much worse. What impressed me most was seeing life from the point of view of a slave. Even when given a "good life" -- fed and housed properly, not beaten or raped -- why would a slave want to be free? My heart fell for her when she realized the prejudice that pervaded the North. Even when free, she was not. Although we think we know slavery, we do not know it until we feel it. Harriet Jacobs helps us understand its true meaning.

Superadded to the burden common to all, they have wrongs, and sufferings, and mortifications peculiarly their own. I might not have read it at all but was inspired to by an excellent recent scholarly but very readable article: Health reform and antislavery rhetoric in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the life of a slave girl," by Sarah L. Berry in the March issue of Jnl of Medical Humanities.

Berry's article made an important point, which were all the more clear when reading the entire narrative: Furthermore, the power that her master - Dr. Norcom Dr Flint in the anonymized narrative exerted not just as a slaveholder, but as a physician-slaveholder, is also clear. Her fear, even when seemingly safely away in the north after her escape, of the Fugitive Slave Law, is palpable. This book is extremely important as it is one of the few, if not only, female slave narratives written and published before the Civil War. Shockingly eye-opening look at slavery up close. Douglass tells his incredibly painful, yet triumphant story with such clarity and openness that while reading of his experiences, anyone with a heart will not so easily forget it.

It was an easy read in that there was no struggle to understand every thought, word, idea, circumstance or emotion he conveyed to paper. Those same qualities, for me, was why it was one of the most difficult things to read. It is a painful to say the least reminder that no matter what color we are, or whatever differences we have, we must never again allow ourselves to lose sight of our basic humanity toward each other.

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Incidents in The Life of A Slave Girl

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Add both to Cart Add both to List. Buy the selected items together This item: Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. The Way We Lived: Attitudes Toward Sex in Antebellum America: Year of the Fires: The Story of the Great Fires of The Making of African America: The Four Great Migrations. Sponsored products related to this item What's this? Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.

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From Library Journal Published in , this was one of the first personal narratives by a slave and one of the few written by a woman. Dover Thrift Editions Paperback: Dover Publications; Reprint edition November 9, Language: Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Sense and Sensibility Modern Library Classics. Try the Kindle edition and experience these great reading features: Share your thoughts with other customers.

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The Making of African America: Amazon Drive Cloud storage from Amazon. Add both to Cart Add both to List. In fact, many Black writers during this period refused to publish their experiences for fear that they will be caught and returned to slavery. Berry's article made an important point, which were all the more clear when reading the entire narrative: A rare firsthand account of a courageous woman's determination and endurance, this inspirational story also represents a valuable historical record of the continuing battle for freedom and the preservation of family.

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. This autobiography was assigned to me when I was a junior in high school. Three years later, as a sophomore in college, I was asked to read the book again for my class on Black Thought and Literature. I wish that I had taken the time to slow down and analyze Frederick Douglass' narrative from a literal, analytical, and figurative perspective.

The emotion and conviction with which the author writes is not only poetic and moving, but captivating as well. The imagery, combined with Douglass' views on religion's role in the enslavement of black bodies, masterfully paints a story that in combination with other narratives has, unfortunately, been lost throughout time. In fact, many Black writers during this period refused to publish their experiences for fear that they will be caught and returned to slavery. In other cases, some writers used pen names to add some anonymity to their experiences. Nevertheless, such works should be cherished and valued; for they allow us to gain a better understanding of how far our society has come, and how much more needs to be done to ensure a future where everyone is equal in the truest sense of the word.

This is the edition close to the original. Be careful as many other editions are out with additional opinions by modern "interpreters". This book, from the original author, needs no added opinions or editorials. Still quite a moving read more than years after it was written. I am not yet 50 years old, yet I have seen in my own lifetime the unreasonable attitude that has somehow been passed down over time to this generation.

Several times, I have seen my very own friends mistreated because they are black. It stems from a lack of compassion, grown out of fear or ignorance. I recommend this book as a most important read for our adolescent children, no matter what their racial or cultural surroundings have taught them. To enslave is to be immoral. I had read this story once before. The scenes seemed familiar, but didn't recognize it until I was partway through the book. Once my memory was jogged, I decided to finish the book because I knew I'd enjoy it again.

Really, it's hard to imagine hiding away in a cramped space for seven years. Obviously, the alternative was much worse.

What impressed me most was seeing life from the point of view of a slave. Even when given a "good life" -- fed and housed properly, not beaten or raped -- why would a slave want to be free? My heart fell for her when she realized the prejudice that pervaded the North. Even when free, she was not. Although we think we know slavery, we do not know it until we feel it. Harriet Jacobs helps us understand its true meaning.