My Rainbow Story : My Bi-Polar Journey

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My Spiritual Awakening/Mental Hospital/Bipolar Experience. Kundalini (They said I was crazy!)

Johnson for her willingness to open up and reveal aspects of her life that were extremely personal. If you are struggling and need to reach out, reach for this book. Feb 19, Roger DeBlanck rated it it was amazing Shelves: What I find most impressive about Susan Johnson's memoir is that she has put together such a riveting narrative.

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As she makes clear throughout the book, one of the challenges of living with bipolar manic depression has been organizing her thoughts in a coherent fashion. This was especially difficult during her college years when writing papers proved nearly debilitating due to her illness. You wouldn't know that was a problem while reading her incredible story, where she openly explores the most What I find most impressive about Susan Johnson's memoir is that she has put together such a riveting narrative.

You wouldn't know that was a problem while reading her incredible story, where she openly explores the most pressing details of bipolar that allow us to see inside the great battle she endured on her road to success.

It is amazing to read about how she charts her memories of dealing with various aspects of bipolar from early childhood, through her adolescence and teen years, and into her adulthood. By the end of the journey, the true value of the book resonates loud and clear: Johnson is a testament to someone who refuses to allow her bipolar to dictate the way she wants to live and the goals she wants to achieve. She not only earned her bachelor's degree, but she is now using all of the adversity from her past as a way to inspire others to overcome their bleakest days when dealing with a mental illness.

As an educator, Johnson has found her calling and fulfilled her dream to work with children. Her memoir is an extraordinary example of the candor and courage needed to take on life's many challenges. Johnson shares an inspiring story that can help others see the light even in their darkest hours. Aug 30, Linda Thompson rated it it was amazing. The ups and downs Susan has lived through would have done in people of lesser strength. While reading her story I felt empathy and admiration, but never sympathy or pity. Her parents were by her side for all the ups and downs, always supportive yet allowing her the independence she so badly wanted and needed.

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I was absolutely elated when, at the end, she wrote that she had finally found the love of her life. No one deserves it more than Susan.

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"Susan's memoir of living with bipolar disorder is a 'love story,' in my view. reader on the journey of someone with 'bipolar manic-depression' (her name for the. Be gentle with yourself, God knows the way, And He will lead you into a new day. So do not try to MY BIPOLAR JOURNEY Hi, my name is Melanie. I have.

For anyone who has bipolar, or knows someone who has bipolar, this book is a must-read. Johnson for surviving her journey to find love and happiness. Jan 22, Jessica Bukowinski rated it really liked it. I love memoirs for understanding the perspectives of others who have experienced something I have not.

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They are especially good for understanding mental illness. This book kept my interest, and gave insight into the experience of one bipolar individual. Knowing the author, and having had our lives intersect during some of the time covered in the book kept me even more engaged. I looked forward to carving out time to finish reading it.

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Her written voice is very similar to the spoken voice I remem I love memoirs for understanding the perspectives of others who have experienced something I have not. Her written voice is very similar to the spoken voice I remember from our teenage years - it is very authentic. Typos don't usually bother me, but they did in this book. Additional editing would have made it more polished.

I am guessing that would come with a bigger publisher.

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Karen Darling rated it it was amazing Sep 26, Kathi rated it liked it Jun 30, Christine Wolf rated it really liked it Nov 04, Felicia rated it liked it Jan 04, Grace had become my enemy. I hated her more and more with each breath I took in. I hated her with every fiber in my body. I was deceived and a fool for thinking she was my best friend. She had turned on me… When the weekend had ended, there was a nasty storm brewing within me. There was no telling what my future would hold when I returned home.

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Perhaps that was for the best. She tells the raw story.

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First, she learned to love herself, second she then found a soulmate with whom she fell in love and married, and above all she found the love of God through her faith as she worked her way toward stability. There was one more love Susan expressed after she married.

It was a child she dreamed of having, but that did not yet exist. She decided not to have children because bipolar is genetic and she wanted to spare a child from a lifetime of the pain she endured. I was happy she combined the new name for the disease with the original name because it made it quite clear what she has to anyone not familiar the mental illness. I found myself envying Susan because she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder when she was young and she had sympathetic parents who accepted mental illness and were not ashamed of it.