Commodify Your Dissent: Salvos from The Baffler

Commodify Your Dissent: Salvos from The Baffler

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Commodify Your Dissent: The Business of Culture in the New Gilded Age

You can remove the unavailable item s now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout. Continue shopping Checkout Continue shopping. Chi ama i libri sceglie Kobo e inMondadori. The Bible is a better book, but just barely. Mar 25, Lobstergirl rated it really liked it Shelves: You can never go wrong with the lovely Thomas Frank or anything written for the Baffler, the alternative randomly-published journal out of Chicago. Actually I'm not sure it's being published any longer.

Frank has gone on to write famous books and has a column in the Wall Street Journal. Apr 10, AndreaZ rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: While furthering my tendency toward being a curmudgeon, this book also contains some razor-sharp writing and wit about all sorts of topics I thought I'd never be interested in. The cheezy graphics heighten the irony. May 14, Logan rated it really liked it. A series of parodical polemics that crucifies the beat generation ethos against the bodies of disrupt! Funny, acidic and shockingly fresh--written some 20 years ago.

As a modern analog, it feels like a lot of the same character and spirit that reflects some of what makes Silicon Valley so despairingly funny: Corporate America is not an oppressor but a sponsor of fun, provider of lifestyle accoutrements, facilitator of carnival, our slang-speaking partner in the quest for that ever-more apocalyptic orgasm. The countercultural idea has become capitalist orthodoxy, its hunger for transgression upon transgression now perfectly suited to an economic-cultural regime that runs on ever-faster cyclings of the new; its taste for self-fulfillment and its intolerance for the confines of tradition now permitting vast latitude in consuming practices and lifestyle experimentation.

Mar 04, Jimmacc rated it really liked it. A series of essays that look under the hood of today's pop and business culture. I think the essay "dark ages" is particularly poignant now.

Jul 04, Jonathan rated it really liked it Shelves: Very enjoyable and useful, though flawed. The essays in Commodify Your Dissent cover a lot of ground, but their central claim is that chaotic individual self-expression, far from challenging authority as its champions pretend, is in fact enslaving the American individual to corporate authority.

The pursuit of endless sensations and fashions has placed unquestioned power in the hands of oligarchs, who no longer have to respond to criticism in the public sphere; actually, the corporations now own Very enjoyable and useful, though flawed. The pursuit of endless sensations and fashions has placed unquestioned power in the hands of oligarchs, who no longer have to respond to criticism in the public sphere; actually, the corporations now own the public sphere.

Most of these essays are persuasive, but I think several miss the source of the infestation. They fail to explain how such a surreal contemporary culture can seem so compelling. In other words, they ignore the fact that consumers often do have a vision of the good life that is not limited to sheer sensuality. As a result, it seems to me, these authors underestimate the importance of demonstrating the superiority of their version of the good life.

Too often, they are content to ascribe our cultural captivity simply to sinister corporate scheming, against which much righteous spleen should be discharged. That's good as far as it goes, but Thomas Frank is the only contributor who comes close to explaining the demand side of "popcult" to my satisfaction.

Fortunately, Frank does this in the first essay in the book, which makes the collection far more coherent than it would be otherwise. The other authors sometimes veer close to the sort of lifestyle liberationism and subcultural self-congratulation that has proven so profitable to their targets.

In fact, there's a lot of bluster here. Still, they're on the right track. The passing of twelve years -- in which the dream of a rulerless "blogosphere" promoting independent voices has parted to reveal the prospect of Facebook and MySpace owning our relationships -- has only underscored the importance of the points they raised at the beginning of the Internet Age. Jul 23, Jon added it.

This book is a selection of some of the best BAFFLER essays, including a withering analysis of the hype surrounding the young novelist Donna Tartt's career, Steve Albini's scathing dissection of the rock-music industry, Gary Groth's well-reasoned attack on Quentin Tarantino, and Kim Phillips' empathetic look at inner-city residents who blow their meager dough on the lottery. Another amusing high point is an account of how a young record-label employee from Seattle fooled the NY TIMES into printing a list of fake "grunge-subculture" lingo.

Sometimes the humor gets somewhat strained, as with a prospectus for an imaginary company, and sometimes the writers' judgments are questionable, as with Maura Mahoney's dismissal of Beat literature as worthless. But for the most part, these thought-provoking pieces remain relevant perhaps unfortunately , and the book as a whole is even more interesting than any of Frank's own books since a variety of different viewpoints are included.

Oct 10, Meg rated it liked it. Having absorbed most of the arguments within during my zine-reading days in the '90s Steve Albini doesn't think bands should sign with major labels? Also included is the infamous, completely fabricated grunge slang glossary provided to the New York Times by a Caroline Records employee. If you're a fellow sentimental lamestain who finds yourself bound and hagged, this is Having absorbed most of the arguments within during my zine-reading days in the '90s Steve Albini doesn't think bands should sign with major labels? If you're a fellow sentimental lamestain who finds yourself bound and hagged, this is an effective reminder of the days when corporate co-optation of youth culture seemed like a major cause for outrage.

Mar 21, Mike Goren rated it liked it Shelves: Despite the obvious timeless truth of the basic thesis, this book comes off surprisingly dated. Its failure to address the many positive and negative changes wrought by the Internet feels like a glaring omission, albeit an understandable one given that the book was published in ' The chapters that do address the Internet are, in retrospect, hilariously overly simplistic - and far too technological determinist for my liking.

Likewise, this book plays up the role of big media and franchise re Despite the obvious timeless truth of the basic thesis, this book comes off surprisingly dated. Likewise, this book plays up the role of big media and franchise restaurants in a way that is still relevant, but the critique would benefit from acknowledgement of more recent changes. Nov 21, Bob Sanders rated it really liked it. Jun 26, Jeremy rated it it was amazing. I've always loved The Baffler and this compilation is some of the best.

One thing that fascinates me is that when I read this book in public it always provokes questions from strangers and usually leads to interesting discussions. I often read books in public and no other book has this effect on innocent passerby. Has anyone else noticed this, or is it just me? Nov 19, Leilani rated it really liked it.

I recently picked up this book at a store and thought it looked like it could be good book to buy It was a strong collection, and the politics are akin to mine, so overall it was a pretty enjoyable read. Sep 16, Ben rated it really liked it. Reading this for the second time, recalling how it blew my mind in or whenever it was.

It's certainly dated now, but spirit of "blunting the cutting edge" feels as generally relevant as it ever was.

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Commodify Your Dissent: Salvos from the Baffler [Thomas Frank, Matt Weiland] on domaine-solitude.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. From the pages of The. From the pages of The Baffler, the most vital and perceptive magazine of the nineties Commodify Your Dissent: The Business of Culture in the New Gilded Age.

Mar 24, Grumpus McGrouchy rated it it was amazing. Love the deconstruction of Garfield Rollins. If you like this book, feel free to subscribe to the magazine. It recently started up again. America needs more 'salvos' like these. Bariloche Home for sale.

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