The World in Half

Half the World’s Population Lives in Just 1% of the Land [Map]

Jul 09, Bethany Stephens rated it liked it. I really loved this book, which I also inhaled while on vacation in Florida. I've found I particularly like a number of authors from Central and South America: Like Come Together, Fall Apart, Henriquez doesn't go to the expected, and she conveys the Panama landscape and the lingering effects of the building of the Panama Canal with prowess. I was delighted to recommend this book to I really loved this book, which I also inhaled while on vacation in Florida. I was delighted to recommend this book to my Panamanian pastor, who had a similar childhood with a mother with dementia and a father from Panama, to over-simplify.

Her delight in the book and the fact that she immediately purchased copies for her sisters exemplified for me why we read and why we recommend - the delight when someone else explores the same world we've just explored and you then share a special bond. Aug 18, Alisa rated it really liked it Shelves: I'm a bit of a sucker for reading books where I can picture myself in the setting I live in Hyde Park but I truly enjoyed the symbolism used throughout this novel.

Heartbreaking, revealing, and still hopeful, this book brightened my spirit. Oct 24, Amanda rated it it was amazing Shelves: A very complex and layered story about home, our connections to places, family and ultimately hope. May 13, Shawna rated it liked it. I felt something was left to be desired, Im not sure what. But a generally interesting and moving story about a college student who goes looking for her birth father in Panama. Sep 29, Ericka rated it liked it.

But the main character was just I kept wondering when the pace would pick up but the plot was very slow for the first three-quarters of the book. Overall, it was decent writing but fell flat i I really wanted to like this book, especially since I loved The Book of Unknown Americans. Overall, it was decent writing but fell flat in execution. Jun 22, Mary rated it really liked it. An eloquent exploration into a young girl's origins. Mira has never known her father. She grew up in Chicago with only her mom who has kept her past behind her. Mira finds some letters her father wrote to her mother and they set in motion Mira's quest to meet the man.

Her parents met in Panama. There is much to learn, but suffice it to say, this young girl finds a way to become whole. Jul 02, Nina rated it really liked it.

The World in Half

Despite being super annoyed at what an irresponsible traveler Miraflores is I mean you don't just stay with strangers dude , I really loved the focus on family, the exploration of the difficulty and complexity of our love for those around us, and the breaks that happen in our lives that change it forever. Looking forward to reading more from this author. Sep 27, Marion rated it really liked it Shelves: This was an easy read with complexities to it that I appreciated the further in I got.

I felt such empathy for Miraflores too. Jul 27, Lis rated it it was amazing Shelves: This quite a lovely book, beautifully written. A young woman's search for her father, and also a search for the young woman her mother was -- the mother who is now disappearing into Alzheimer's. Feb 08, Dmkb rated it liked it. Never meets her dad, very sad. Mom dying from complications for Alzheimer's. Relationship with Danilo left open-ended.

May 28, Bluma Schneider rated it really liked it. Very interesting story line. I felt it dragged a little but I liked it. I hope she writes another one. Characters were well depicted. Jul 23, Patty Busch rated it really liked it. An endearing richly layered novel. Didn't realize how much I loved it until it was over. Jul 27, Heather rated it it was amazing Shelves: Feb 22, Isabelle rated it really liked it Shelves: The parallels were all meaningful, if a bit numerous; I enjoyed the diverse cast and various subplots. May 13, Beth rated it really liked it. This book explores the difference between what a daughter knew of her mother, and reality.

Most of the book, takes place in Panama, when Mira goes in search of her father, a father she thought abandoned her, but meanwhile, her mother abandoned her father. As you learn about the mother, you can see the similarities between her actions and Mira's, and wonder if history is going to repeat itself.

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The descriptions of Panama are wonderful, and you really learn more about Mira, her mother, her father This book explores the difference between what a daughter knew of her mother, and reality. The descriptions of Panama are wonderful, and you really learn more about Mira, her mother, her father and the boy trying to aid Mira, Danilo.

The ending of the book left many unanswered questions, and I thought it could've been concluded more solid than it was. Overall, a very enjoyable read. Jul 13, Cecilia rated it liked it. I enjoyed this book "in half". The great half was the imagery and the writing. I loved the fact that the protagonist was a scientist-geologist student and that the earth itself was used as an analogy for the intimate emotions of a young life.

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That "half" was "elegant" as one reviewer put it, rich, evocative dabbling in story lines that were full of promise-- lost love, lost self, loss of innocence. Unfortunately, the "other half" seemed trite; lacking in the boldness to make the characters be I enjoyed this book "in half". Unfortunately, the "other half" seemed trite; lacking in the boldness to make the characters be heroic or truly awful.

I wanted "full" people and instead I got "half" people.

Half the World’s Population Will Experience Deadly Heat by the End of the Century

I thought about giving it four stars because the one half was so good but I am sticking with 3 for the missed opportunity. Jul 10, Koby rated it it was amazing Shelves: I bought this book expecting to fall in love after reading The Book of Unknown Americans.

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Start by marking “The World in Half” as Want to Read: Miraflores has never known her father, and until now, she's never thought that he wanted to know her. Cristina Henríquez is the author of The Book of Unknown Americans, which was a New York Times Notable Book of and. The World in Half Paperback – February 2, Now in paperback, the "beautiful" (Chicago Sun-Times) novel from the prizewinning author of Come Together, Fall Apart. Cristina Henríquez is the author of Come Together, Fall Apart: A Novella and Stories and the forthcoming novel.

Miraflores' story was extremely accessible, despite not being the most common. Everyone could find a bit of themselves in her, and this is one of the features that makes the story such a successful one. The other characters are all beautifully written as well. The struggles presented all seem as simultaneously basic and complex as ours.

Readers of all age have something to find in The World in Half. The worlds of Chicago and Panama alike come alive with her touch, and make this a thoroughly enjoyable experience. May 17, Hans rated it really liked it. I have devoured the three Cristina Henriquez books and look forward to reading more from her. She tells these stunning stories that have universal elements, while being firmly rooted in specific places and cultures.

That is a fine line to walk. It was interesting to read this book at the same time as the graphic novel La Perdida by Jessica Abel. There is an echo of elements between the two books view spoiler [ a young woman goes to the country of her father to discover his life and better unders I have devoured the three Cristina Henriquez books and look forward to reading more from her. There is an echo of elements between the two books view spoiler [ a young woman goes to the country of her father to discover his life and better understand herself hide spoiler ].

However, the heroines in the stories, make very different choices, so the two volumes have very different trajectories. Dec 08, Anna rated it liked it. A young Chicago woman's search for her father in Panama City is a good read. Miraflora, named after one of the locks of the Panama Canal, is looking for answers about her mother's affair with a man, while her husband was stationed in Central America. Now that her mother is suffering with Alzheimer's, Mira wants find out more about the man her mother will never discuss.

Finding a cache of old letters, which starts to change Mira's impression of her father, she sets out alone to visit a country wh A young Chicago woman's search for her father in Panama City is a good read. Finding a cache of old letters, which starts to change Mira's impression of her father, she sets out alone to visit a country which she knows only from school books. Vivid descriptions of the setting, and some information about the Canal, added to my interest in this debut novel.

Jan 10, Sara rated it it was amazing Shelves: I wrote this as I was reading it: I am loving every second of this novel! It's so easy to read it's like I'm hearing it right from her mouth - opposed to sitting and reading it. It's smart and witty, deep and meaningful - without being overly techical or detailed.

It's great, I'm half way through and highly recommend it. Now that I've finished it - It was fantastic. Just as the workers toiled to connect the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, ' The World in Half' tries to reconcile two countries and cultures, as well as parents. In fact, she reflects that her own interest in geography stems from learning about continental drift in school.

Her new companion, Danilo, surprises her by insisting that Central America is a continent, as well. At times, the pace of the novel lags a bit, especially in a few of the less significant scenes in Panama, but it could also be argued that the narrative merely reflects the daily rhythms of its surroundings. The canal, however, pulls Miraflores back to her central quest. While touring it with Danilo, Miraflores learns that her father has not worked at the canal since the s, and that once he may have caused a serious, near-accident at his work.

You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post. Chicago's most circulated library books. Interesting characters and a glimpse of what it's like to not know your heritage. She created a vivid picture of Panama. She does an excellent job of charter development while describing the warmth of the culture.

The World in half deals with love and loss. It is a mystery, a lesson about the need to know where you came from and who you came from.

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She confronts Alzheimer's , loyalty and sacrifice in her adventure. I enjoyed the writing style of Christina Henriquez - thought the story started out very well but then became a little flat and somewhat unbelievable. But I gave it three stars because I do really like her writing - very clever - just the plot line was tedious. This is a wonderful book that will make you fall in love with the characters.

It is beautifully written, the story is amazing, the words are inspiring. Although Mira's mother had always told her that her father never wanted a child and abandoned them, the letters told a completely different story. Her father wrote about his love and devotion to her mother and it was revealed that once he found out she was pregnant, he was excited to be a father. Mira is confused by this contradiction and wonders why her mother had lied to her.

Mira is unable to confront her mother about it because she has early-onset Alzheimer's and besides, she knew her mother would never tell her the truth. Mira hires a nurse to care for her mother and heads off to Panama City to find the father she never knew.

Once there, Mira questions her impulsive decision, which went against her usual rational behavior. One morning she encounters a young man who piques her interest and after hearing her story, volunteers to help her find her father. What starts off as a trip to meet her father ends up turning into a journey of self-exploration and self-discovery. Mira learns a lot about herself and struggles to come to terms with her own identity.

The World in Half is a beautifully written story that has a certain underlying magic to it. The characters are first introduced as one-dimensional, with simple thoughts and emotions. However, once the novel progresses, their depth and complexity become apparent and there is more to them than meets the eye.

The plot itself it interesting, but I think the most compelling thing about the book is its quiet hold over the reader. I kept reading on further and further, not because of thrilling plot twists, but because I genuinely felt a connection to the characters and to the story.

I loved how Mira's search for her father turned out to be a search for herself. Her father represented all of the parts of herself and her identity that she was missing in order to feel whole. Exploring Panama City and learning about love helped open up her eyes. By the end, I really sensed her character's evolution and development. This book has positive messages embedded throughout the narrative and Mira was the perfect vehicle for conveying them.

Although it is possible to go through life without discovering who you are as a person, that is not living life but merely existing. The way things turned out for Mira was unexpected but it wasn't the ending that mattered, rather the journey it took to get there. The World in Half is a well-written story about characters you will care about and possesses a certain subtle power that will inevitably take hold of you.

I found myself transported to Chicago and Panama, in turn, and entranced by the beauty that I found in this author's first novel. Miraflores is a geology student at the University of Chicago - I was immediately drawn to the setting since I used to work at the hospital there. She was raised by a single mother who has been becoming ill, and while going through some of her mother's papers, Mira discovers letters from her Panamanian father. Letters that reveal a great love and a different story than the one she has heard all her life and that nearly brought me to tears.

Hoping to find something in Panama for herself and for her mother, Mira plans a trip to Panama, without the knowledge of her mother.