The Art Of Deceit


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Kevin Mitnick, the world's most famous former computer hacker, has been the subject of countless news and magazine articles, the idol of thousands of would-be hackers, and a one-time "most wanted" criminal of cyberspace, on the run from the bewildered Feds. That every story reads like a bad and I mean bad noir film isn't just annoying; it makes them much less credible. The Art Of Deceit was the perfect name for this book, because it had to be an art form that Tangie was born with. Her mother instilled a lot of her attitude in her. She uses and abuses people and it doesn't seem to affect her at all. Dec 12, Ollie Moss rated it it was amazing. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway.

Learn more about Amazon Prime. The world's most infamous hacker offers an insider's view of the low-tech threats to high-tech security Kevin Mitnick's exploits as a cyber-desperado and fugitive form one of the most exhaustive FBI manhunts in history and have spawned dozens of articles, books, films, and documentaries.

The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security by Kevin D. Mitnick

Since his release from federal prison, in , Mitnick has turned his life around and established himself as one of the most sought-after computer security experts worldwide. Now, in The Art of Deception, the world's most notorious hacker gives new meaning to the old adage, "It takes a thief to catch a thief. With the help of many fascinating true stories of successful attacks on business and government, he illustrates just how susceptible even the most locked-down information systems are to a slick con artist impersonating an IRS agent.

Narrating from the points of view of both the attacker and the victims, he explains why each attack was so successful and how it could have been prevented in an engaging and highly readable style reminiscent of a true-crime novel. And, perhaps most importantly, Mitnick offers advice for preventing these types of social engineering hacks through security protocols, training programs, and manuals that address the human element of security.

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The Art of Deceit

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The Art of Manipulation includes Deception, Pride, Witchcraft and Divination

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The Art of Deception is a book by Kevin Mitnick that covers the art of social engineering. Part of the book is composed of real stories, and examples of how social. The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security. Kevin D. Mitnick, William L. Simon, Steve Wozniak (Foreword by). ISBN:

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How do you want to be remembered? Will you leave a legacy that will last beyond your lifetime? Product details File Size: Wiley; 1 edition August 20, Publication Date: August 20, Sold by: Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. Master the dark art of anonymity with 5 books that you'll never forget! Darknet assassins, exotic goods plus access to hundreds of secret files. Real life hacking scenario of how to break into a bank. Up to date tools and custom scripts. How decentralization will allow us to transcend politics, c This manifesto on decentralization is changing the way people think about politics, society, and what it means to be human.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. December Learn how and when to remove this template message. It's certainly likely that The Art of Deception has done and will continue to do more good than harm, which is more than can be said for most popular books on any kind of security. That doesn't make it any less repetitive, though. Jan 22, Son Tung rated it really liked it.

Mitnick - a former hacker turned security expert - gives an excellent view on security threats posed by human factor in modern world. The common sense that computer geeks are often fat, unpopular with heavy glasses and nerdy faces is not applicable in "Social Engineer" category. Social engineer is someone with talent and understanding for both social behavior and technical command. The funny parts are, sometimes the job can be done by curious individuals or dumpster scavengers. Imagine the work done by industrial spies to create heavy impact spionage!

You will find dialogs which so amazingly similar with those in heist movies. Yep, it is real and complex. It was an enjoyable read for me, some parts are repetitive, i felt like a voice of an old, experienced man keeps echoing: Its all about human, not about fancy technology or machine. Mar 01, G. Lupo rated it really liked it. Kevin Mitnick is probably best known for being a phone phreak and fugitive computer hacker in the lates and early 90s, who was the focus of a considerable manhunt.

Following his capture and time in prison, he's become an Internet security consultant and turned his talents to helping people avoid the sort of hacks he became famous for perpetrating. This book is a chronicle of numerous social engineering attacks, some hypothetical, some based on real-world examples which may or may not have be Kevin Mitnick is probably best known for being a phone phreak and fugitive computer hacker in the lates and early 90s, who was the focus of a considerable manhunt. This book is a chronicle of numerous social engineering attacks, some hypothetical, some based on real-world examples which may or may not have been carried out by Mitnick himself and recommendations for how to guard against such attacks.

I actually recognize a number of the policies he recommends as being part of the security awareness my company conducts every year for employees, so apparently, someone listened. I must admit I found the anecdotes more interesting than the policy recommendations, though someone tasked with guarding his or her companies assets would no doubt find these of immense value.

The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security

Definitely worth a read. Mar 29, Russell rated it liked it. I found the most valuable sections in this book to be the policy recommendations and information security practices described in the last chapters despite their age. I'll probably buy this book simply because of the security policy information and the easy-to-understand business cases that are easily comprehendible due to their storylike nature. Feb 24, Azamali rated it really liked it.

This was a tough read. Very dry and if you've ever worked in a corporate environment, or IT at all, most of this is simply common sense. Some of the 'examples' used are repeated in Kevin's other book, Ghost in the Wires, which I read before this one.

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GitW is a good read, this one, not so much Jul 07, Stefan rated it it was ok. While the book demonstrates the basic concept of social engineering quite well, it would never have got so much attention if Mitnick's name wasn't on the cover. It's okay, but it's not extraordinary. Jun 19, YHC rated it really liked it. I started to read this book last night and turned sleepless due to some similarity that i have encountered in the morning. A mail came to my email box saying someone in Ukraine using my email address to sign in a so called Gaijin. We were not able to determine whether the previous login to I started to read this book last night and turned sleepless due to some similarity that i have encountered in the morning.

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We were not able to determine whether the previous login to the system was performed using this device or application. Maybe you did it using a new computer, phone or browser. If you did not perform such actions, then there is a high possibility that your account has been hacked. Please read this article.

The message is generated automatically and does not require a response. Unsubscribe from these notifications " I actually went to check out, according to their instruction that if i didn't create an account i should block it. It asked me to verify with my real email address even I needed to key in my password. I stopped there, didn't go on. Why should i hand in my password of mail address to some hackers just like that, but it really happens to everyone that under panic we would actually just react without thinking.

In the era of technology, we are easily to become the victims of hackers. I am so fed up with credit cards hacking coz saw many people sharing this experience and find it ruins your good mood specially while you travel. With some technique of psychology, doing favors, human networking, they get their target easily.

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We all need to be careful! Aug 20, Stephen rated it liked it Shelves: Interesting at first, but very repetitive. Mitnick, who claims his career as a hacker was passed solely on manipulating people to gain information and access, shares stories of others who did the same. These mostly include private investigators, with at least one pair of curious teenagers and a few bits of corporate espionage.

The modus operandi in all the cases is very similar: Information is solicited under false pretense from various people, then combined to gain further access or the answers. Mitnick refers to this as social engineering, and it's obvious from his collection that a high degree of charisma is required to gain the trust or goodwill of subjects; Mitnick also points out how the actors manipulate the people they're interacting with, pushing buttons for sympathy and fear.

There are very few cases included here of people working in person; the simplest case involved a man studying a business to find out when the office staff left, and when the janitors arrived. He then approached the place in a suit and briefcase, and pretended to be an office worker who needed to run in and get a few things from his office -- allowing him free run of the place. Mitnick ends each section, and the book in total, with advice on how to secure and compartmentalize information so employees don't accidentally give the farm away.

This includes strict policies and training to control the flow of information, emphasizing the need to verify the identity and need of people requesting information. Jun 22, Aron rated it did not like it Shelves: As the title suggests, the focus of this book is social engineering-based security threats. While I think it's generally accepted that this is the least controllable and therefore weakest element of security, if you're wondering how this ballooned into pages The summary of pretty much every story in every chapter is "be sure to conclusively verify the identity of anyone you're giving information to.

It As the title suggests, the focus of this book is social engineering-based security threats. It wasn't until the final chapter that I gave up and started skimming. That chapter is 70 pages of recommendations for corporate security policies. If I hadn't read Ghost in the Wires a memoir and a much better book, by the way , at least the overabundant and repetitive examples would have been fresh, but as it turns out, most of them are taken directly from his experiences.

Aug 06, Jami rated it really liked it Shelves: The book was interesting, and I definitely picked up some ideas. While I don't plan on becoming totally invisible I guess I wouldn't be writing this review if I was! While I always enjoy Ray Porter as a narrator, the content of this book probably would lend itself better to print format if you want to use all of the tool I enjoyed Kevin's Ghost in the Wires, so I picked this one up; I was not disappointed.

While I always enjoy Ray Porter as a narrator, the content of this book probably would lend itself better to print format if you want to use all of the tools in the book. Some of them have steps or instructions that are probably better followed in print. For my purposes, audio was fine. Jul 13, Chocolategoddess rated it liked it Shelves: Having worked in IT for a while, I already knew a lot of this, especially how willing people are to just hand over their passwords and chuckle while they tell you not to break into their bank account because they use the same password for everything.

As such, I was really only there for the anecdotes and they weren't all that thrilling. I'm sure a business owner who isn't tech-savvy could get a lot out of this book, it just wasn't aimed at me.