The Stumpwork Robe (The Chronicles of Eirie Book 1)


It's not a mystery, of course, so that's not the main point of the author, but I'd rather not be told in advance is someone is going to die or not Buy also the second part The Last Stitch if you don't want to have only half of the story. In spite of my not liking first person narration, I enjoyed this unusual ride of love and hatred.

The characters are well rounded, and even the crazy villain has a reason for madness. It's a very original fantasy, now if you'll excuse me, I have to start reading the next book The premise is irresistible: The most impressive thing about the book, for me, was the pacing. Never once did I feel impatient because some plot point or exposition needed to muscle its way in, or rushed along because something had to be tied up before interest flagged. The time spent with each idea exactly matched its importance. In fact, because I was a good little reader and didn't turn to the last page to see how it ended, the same steady pacing, as the book was clearly nearing its end, heightened the suspense enormously.

Some great resolution was clearly imminent, and as I turned the last page, I had the thrill of realizing simultaneously that the book was ending exactly as it should, and that the story wasn't finished at all!

The Stumpwork Robe

And the story and characters drove me very smoothly along. Pulling believable people out of a fantasy world is much harder than putting a few sketchily drawn stick figures into a kitchen-sink melodrama and hoping the real world will rub off on the characters. These people aren't overdrawn, and I felt for them, and missed them when they were gone. Except the villain, who seems as flat as Cruella de Ville.

how to embroider goldwork/stumpwork insect wings

Doesn't she have any ambiguity? And on a more persnickety note, it's wonderful nowadays to find a book that hasn't been copy-edited by Spell-Check. It seems the older I get, the more typos I find in novels, but this one was clean as a whistle. And in the end, how many novels are there going to be with miniature books in them? I'm so glad Ms.

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Batten wrote this, it gave me immense pleasure, and I can't wait to see what happens next. I hope she sells a million! This story is an interwoven life of an expert in embroidery who tells her story and the multifaceted lives of several characters through her creations. An original novel, original views and wonderfully mystical and yet a realist tale of several cultures that cross. Absolutely my favorite novel of the year. I am a novice to the craft, but it creates a desire for me to sharpen my skills, and maybe tell my family's story through the artistic and one of a kind craft, possibly through wearable piece of embroidered art.

Prue Batten has talent as a writer--the world she creates is beautiful and believable. She has cleverly woven Celtic mythology and the lore of the fae into a semi-medieval world. Her characters are vivid and engaging, and the plot kept me reading on, wanting to know where it would go. However, she needs to proof read--too many errors in pronoun usage it is necessary for she her and the babe to rest ;verb tense "he opened his palm and lay laid something in it"; and word usage "at a discrete discreet distance". Occasionally I think her love of using a different and unusual word misleads her--such as "making a fulsome discovery", or "silver like a precious chaperon a Queen might wear".

Chaperon is a old word for a hood, but here it makes one think of a chaperone, which is unintentionally funny.

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Fulsome mean abundant in the 13th century, but now has the meaning of flattering or complimentary to an embarrassing or excessive degree. Some words are misspelled--palate for palette, rooves for roofs, mame for maim, misogeny for misogyny. I found her errors bothered me more because Batten has talent and imagination. A good writer should take care to be sure the finished product is truly finished. Never once did I feel impatient because some plot point or exposition needed to muscle its way in, or rushed along because something had to be tied up before interest flagged.

The time spent with each idea exactly matched its importance. In fact, because I was a good little reader and didn't turn to the last page to see how it ended, the same steady pacing, as the book was clearly nearing its end, heightened the suspense enormously. Some great resolution was clearly imminent, and as I turned the last page, I had the thrill of realizing simultaneously that the book was ending exactly as it should, and that the story wasn't finished at all! And the story and characters drove me very smoothly along. Pulling believable people out of a fantasy world is much harder than putting a few sketchily drawn stick figures into a kitchen-sink melodrama and hoping the real world will rub off on the characters.

These people aren't overdrawn, and I felt for them, and missed them when they were gone. Except the villain, who seems as flat as Cruella de Ville. Doesn't she have any ambiguity? And on a more persnickety note, it's wonderful nowadays to find a book that hasn't been copy-edited by Spell-Check. It seems the older I get, the more typos I find in novels, but this one was clean as a whistle.

And in the end, how many novels are there going to be with miniature books in them?

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Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Prue is a fantasy and historical fiction writer who lives in Book 1 of 4 in The Chronicles of Eirie (4 Book Series). The Stumpwork Robe has 96 ratings and 14 reviews. S.J.A. said: I wrote a review of this book years ago, when it first came out, as I was, I think, one of.

I'm so glad Ms. Batten wrote this, it gave me immense pleasure, and I can't wait to see what happens next. I hope she sells a million!

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I look forward to more books by this author! Share your thoughts with other customers. Never once did I feel impatient because some plot point or exposition needed to muscle its way in, or rushed along because something had to be tied up before interest flagged. I hope she sells a million! The main character is a gypsy who has written her story and uses magic to shrink her books down in size and hides them in her embroidery. I've now got to buy the next book to find out what happens to Adelina! Well worked setting, including the writer's own takes on folklore.

Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. This story is an interwoven life of an expert in embroidery who tells her story and the multifaceted lives of several characters through her creations. An original novel, original views and wonderfully mystical and yet a realist tale of several cultures that cross. Absolutely my favorite novel of the year. I am a novice to the craft, but it creates a desire for me to sharpen my skills, and maybe tell my family's story through the artistic and one of a kind craft, possibly through wearable piece of embroidered art.

Prue Batten has talent as a writer--the world she creates is beautiful and believable. She has cleverly woven Celtic mythology and the lore of the fae into a semi-medieval world. Her characters are vivid and engaging, and the plot kept me reading on, wanting to know where it would go. However, she needs to proof read--too many errors in pronoun usage it is necessary for she her and the babe to rest ;verb tense "he opened his palm and lay laid something in it"; and word usage "at a discrete discreet distance".

Occasionally I think her love of using a different and unusual word misleads her--such as "making a fulsome discovery", or "silver like a precious chaperon a Queen might wear". Chaperon is a old word for a hood, but here it makes one think of a chaperone, which is unintentionally funny. Fulsome mean abundant in the 13th century, but now has the meaning of flattering or complimentary to an embarrassing or excessive degree.

Some words are misspelled--palate for palette, rooves for roofs, mame for maim, misogeny for misogyny.

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I found her errors bothered me more because Batten has talent and imagination. A good writer should take care to be sure the finished product is truly finished. Batten keeps writing and finds a good proof reader and editor. Interesting characters, even the 'heroes' have believable flaws.

Well worked setting, including the writer's own takes on folklore. The villains are indeed evil, but not totally one dimensional.

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And one whole star for the way the author wove the story and the embroidery together; I could picture the robe in all its gorgeous, detailed complexity. Read this one, and then go on to the sequel, The Last Stitch. I was sucked in after the very first page of this series. A fantasy of such dimension that I can't find the words to describe it. It must be read.

I'm not half-way through this yet and I'm totally captivated. I love the weaving together of different worlds - one minute you're deep in Celtic mythology, the next you're in North Africa, and then in faery land; yet nothing jars or seems out of place. The story itself is fascinating, I find it hard to stop reading - every chapter draws you forward to the next.

Masterful story-telling and beautiful, lyrical writing. See all 31 reviews. Most recent customer reviews. Published on June 27, Published on April 12, Published on May 1, Published on April 6, Published on April 2, Published on March 30, Published on October 13, Published on June 9, Published on May 5, Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.

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