The Making of the British Landscape: How We Have Transformed the Land, from Prehistory to Today

The Making of the British Landscape : How We Have Transformed the Land, from Prehistory to Today

I would add anything by Francis Pryor to that long list. Grab this book and his car boot list and let British landscape and its history take you on a great big adventure. View all 5 comments. Aug 18, Fiona rated it really liked it Shelves: I would have loved to have given this 5 stars as it is such an interesting, readable book. It whetted my appetite to visit so many places.

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The last two chapters are a badly written rant, however, and this lets the book down. This stream of consciousness, grumpy old man section should have been cut before publication. Jan 13, Changeling72 rated it it was amazing. I guess you would have to be something of a history nerd and probably British to have any interest in this tome, but Pryor writes a detailed, highly readable and engaging history of the British landscape. I have to say that I found the prehistory chapters of the book and prehistory is Pryor's speciality to be particularly interesting.

I have not really taken that much interest in it before, partly, I suspect, since there is less obvious evidence of it on the ground and, of course, no written I guess you would have to be something of a history nerd and probably British to have any interest in this tome, but Pryor writes a detailed, highly readable and engaging history of the British landscape.

I have not really taken that much interest in it before, partly, I suspect, since there is less obvious evidence of it on the ground and, of course, no written historical record. However, if one knows where to look and what to look for I was surprised, too, at the number of barrows and standing stones on the British landscape; people tend to, quite naturally, focus on Stonehenge and Sutton Hoo and forget that there are so many more stones, henges and barrows off the international tourist trail.

I also enjoyed reading about the so-called Dark Ages and how misleading that term is. The later chapters, regarding modern farming, climate change and house-building for an ever-growing population made uncomfortable reading. The planet is, essentially, stuffed, and the British Isles will be getting smaller in the not-too-distant. To sum up, a fascinating read. I will definitely be adding further Pryor tomes to my to-read list. Dec 30, Celia rated it it was amazing.

Read this book to understand better the relationship between man, the landscape, communities and economies. Living in Australia is very individualistic. Driving about in cars everywhere expected to chase jobs around the country to end up living miles away from where you grew up and from family.

I feel a disconnection between each other and the landscape. This detailed book was a slug but it was a wonderful history of man coming together to form communities and build economies told through the tr Read this book to understand better the relationship between man, the landscape, communities and economies. This detailed book was a slug but it was a wonderful history of man coming together to form communities and build economies told through the transformation of the landscape.

The Making Of The British Landscape

Aug 04, Darren Paul rated it really liked it. This is one of those books, like the Cloud Spotters Guide or Earth by Richard Fortey, that makes you see familiar things afresh. It presents the history of Britain, not as a series of dynasties or invasions, but as an unbroken continuum of ordinary people in the landscape from the bronze age right up to the present day.

As long as you don't mind the less objective tone of the chapters covering the 20th century this is well worth a look. Jun 04, Sarah Harkness rated it liked it. I would recommend this to anyone who really doesn't know much about archaeology or landscapes of Britain - I ploughed through it and mostly thought it was very well-written and interesting, learnt tons I didn't know and put a lot more in context May 19, Katie added it.

Love anything by Francis Pryor. Apr 16, Riversue rated it really liked it. Wonderful archaeological and historical detail. Cor Heijboer rated it liked it Sep 04, Oliver Smith rated it it was amazing Sep 07, Ian Ferguson rated it liked it Jun 08, Hale rated it it was amazing Jan 12, Craig Rothery rated it it was amazing Dec 30, Anna rated it liked it Oct 07, Nov 24, Sam Josh rated it it was amazing.

Scott Davies rated it liked it Oct 13, Peter Geyer rated it it was amazing Jan 05, Daniel Gibbons rated it it was amazing Jul 03, Tbergen rated it it was amazing Dec 26, Ian rated it really liked it May 10, Eric rated it it was amazing Aug 03, Mallory Hebert rated it really liked it Dec 30, Charlotte rated it liked it Aug 02, Sime rated it it was amazing Apr 29, Lynn Edwards rated it really liked it Jun 11, Mr Brian Mara rated it liked it Jul 13, Philip Jones rated it it was ok Jul 22, Merry rated it it was amazing Mar 29, Description From our suburban streets which still trace the boundaries of long vanished farms to the Norfolk Broads, formed when medieval peat pits flooded - evidence of man's effect on Britain is everywhere.

Packed with over maps and photographs, compellingly written and argued, this highly acclaimed book will permanently change the way you see your surroundings. Product details Format Paperback pages Dimensions x x 42mm People who bought this also bought.

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We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. American Nations Colin Woodard. Cor Heijboer rated it liked it Sep 04, The later chapters, regarding modern farming, climate change and house-building for an ever-growing population made uncomfortable reading. People who bought this also bought. I would add anything by Francis Pryor to that long list. If I could find anything even half as good as this I would be very happy indeed.

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