Plain Tales from the Hills (Twentieth Century Classics)


Most are polished and interesting. Together they give a large view of British rule in India, showing it to depend on military and organizational control without trying to drastically change India or Indian culture e. Kipling writes about intercultural mis communication, human nature, and fate. And about love, which tends to end in marriage or mutilation, divorce or reconciliation. Kipling's narrator often knows the people in his stories or has heard what happened to them. In most cases he has a distanced point of view, usually not being a major player it's never HIS romance or career that thrives or dies , but he does at times serve as a witness to or supporter of the action of the story.

His tone is ironic. He often plays with us by saying, "But that's another story…" or by explaining that the bad language an officer used while suffering from a case of mistaken identity can't be quoted in its unexpurgated form. Being written by a young man who'd been born in British India and loved it, the tales reveal a mix of pro-empire and pro-indigenous sentiments.

Overall Kipling favors honest human feeling against pretense based on religion or class or culture. He can see the positive and negative sides of the British Empire and Christianity and of Indian cultures and religions. Although he approves of British white men "going native" to learn local languages and cultures, he doesn't condone marrying across boundaries of race and class.

Thus there are some unappealing moments in the collection. One ostensibly funny but really unpleasant story features a young British man in need of saving from his foolish love for an obviously mixed blood lower class woman and her extended family. But many of the stories are great, like those about a sheltered suicide, a lucky alcoholic, a ghost horse, an archery contest, a wizardly con, an opium addict, and a Muslim servant's creative little son. The first story, "Lispeth," is my favorite, featuring a beautiful, direct, and passionate local hill girl baptized and raised by the local British chaplain and his wife and finally made to realize that "You are all liars, you English.

There are some gender-biased lines like, "Regiments are just like women. They will do anything for trinketry. Hauksbee takes over or when "Diana" flamboyantly loses an archery contest. And by many telling lines from the female point of view: Too much work and too much energy kill a man just as effectively as too much assorted vice or too much drink. I recommend this audiobook to fans of Kipling and to anyone interested in how the British Raj worked and what it did to Brits and Indians, but buyers should be aware that its 32 stories are missing eight found in another edition of the print or e book: Apr 15, Michael rated it liked it.

This is a whole series of short stories telling about numerous individuals in Colonial India and tales as told about those individuals. The hills are where the British escaped to in the higher latitudes to avoid the heat of the Indian summer that everyone else had to endure. The author is the listener and he relates to us each of the stories told to him, which are as varied as the British civil servants could be. There were though three stories that I just didn't bother reading because they were This is a whole series of short stories telling about numerous individuals in Colonial India and tales as told about those individuals.

There were though three stories that I just didn't bother reading because they were told in the idiom of British soldiers with a very regional dialect and I found I was translating almost every third word in order to comprehend the tale and trying to achieve that when reading in bed just didn't appeal.

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This book was released July 1, and I pre-ordered without reviews as none were available. Just slight wear to the illustrated brown cloth; a small area of light reddish color in a few places on the front board; owner's bookplate on front pastedown. View or edit your browsing history. Joseph Rudyard Kipling was a journalist, short-story writer, poet, and novelist. One of the best reads for me in a long time. Five years passed before he saw his parents again.

Overall though the book has led me to investigate a number of other novels about the British occupation of India. A series of short stories encompassing a range of styles and moral tales.

There were sections of this book which I really enjoyed, sections which I found charming, some which I found educational and others which were hard because they were written as if someone was speaking with a strong accent. The whole book felt dated, but not necessarily in a bad way. It was almnost funny sometimes to see how attitudes and moral standards have changed since the book was written.

Definatly worth a delve into, A series of short stories encompassing a range of styles and moral tales. Definatly worth a delve into, although you could find yourself skim-reading a tale or two.

Plain Tales From The Hills

Nov 01, Lucy rated it really liked it. If you could remove the Mulvaney stories, this would be a five star review. Kipling writes beautifully except when he is attempting to transcribe accents. The book works as a whole because of the recurrence of various characters, and the consistent style of the narrator. It's astonishing to think how young he was when he wrote these.

Feb 23, Bab rated it really liked it. Oct 31, Manuel Alfonseca rated it really liked it. Interesting collection of short tales that show Kipling's masterly way of writing, specially taking into account that when he wrote them he was little more than twenty. Mar 02, Anne Hart is currently reading it. Kipling later edited, revised, and published this collection of stories for an English audience to enjoy.

He tends to interject his own distinct opinions and thoughts about the people and the times during British Colonialism into his writing. This literary review will contain elements of unfolding historical events in Britain and India as well as the mingling of these two cultures during the early s. Here is an example of just what I am trying to convey. Hauksbee has lost her young child to death and has been highly depressed. This rejection sends the husband out searching for a mistress, thus, Mrs.

Hauksbee is nearly jilted by her husband. Hauksbee begins to grasp the fact that her husband is contemplating an affair she decides she wants to win him back, so, she gets her act together and shows up at a dance in a beautiful dress looking lovely and…above all…with her head on straight for the first time in years!

As the couple dance, their marital relationship is suddenly and miraculously restored. After winning back her man, Mrs. For instance, he often refers to a discord between the British and the Indian peoples because of their opposing traditions and customs. Indians and Europeans who found themselves in a relationship whether it be a love affair, friendship, or a subservient role during the British rule had very different philosophies about relationships, how they were handled, and how they ended up.

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An example of this is found in the story Beyond the Pale Let the White go to the White and the Black to the Black. As he curiously studies the wall he listens and peers through the grate only to hear an Indian widow woman named Bisesa speaking to him. Trejago is captivatingly enticed by this mysterious woman. He continues secretly to frequent the path that leads to Bisesa. Over time the two become friends and eventually lovers when Bisesa bravely opens the grate to let Trejago inside. Trejago is stabbed in the groin and shunned from ever seeing Bisesa again. The wall is boarded up and although Trejago searches for Bisesa, he never finds her.

As an outsider, I do not think Trejago ever imagined that this kind of terror could happen. It also suggests that the aristocratic customs of European diplomacy were more civilized and modern with respect to crime and punishment. These events suggest that the reality of such brutal penalties, such as the severing of hands, were unimaginable in the eyes of the white man. I enjoyed reading these short stories.

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Through his writing, Kipling paints a vivid picture of the lives and customs of two different worlds at the turn of the 20th century and helps us understand insights into the world during the British Colonization of India. Having made Kipling my specialist author for this year, I came into reading him in part unknown and then over time formulating my own view. Looking at his works of 'Indian Tales', I felt it was very poorly written and yes, falls into the stereotypical view of Kipling the Imperialist with an exceptionally poor view of the Indian Inhabitant or "The Savage".

Here though, a lot of his works are very short, but does show a different side to him, very descriptive in parts and of the working lives of t Having made Kipling my specialist author for this year, I came into reading him in part unknown and then over time formulating my own view. Here though, a lot of his works are very short, but does show a different side to him, very descriptive in parts and of the working lives of the British, Military, Missionaries and Local Inhabitants alike in many different forms.

Much of his works in this collection of stories are much better than other works, however, I can especially see why Kipling comes in and out of fashion over time. In part it is intriguing to see such works penned by Kipling early on in this book and Indian Tales and then to come out with something so different as 'The man who would be king' Overall, this collection of short stories are far better than in his set "Indian Tales", however, if you read enough of Kipling, be warned many of the stories are repeated in this collection.

It really does show another side of Kipling. I have gone into reading Kipling this year pretty much as an unknown for me. In time with reading and learning about Kipling, I feel with his prose, he will always be a difficult and time specific author to appreciate. Looking back with modern values on an author growing up in India under the British Empire, it was acceptable to say what he did.

He was however an author writing what was observed and seen at the times, does this make him any less of an author? As adults he will be liked for stories such as 'The Man who would be King'. However, and unfortunately, again with a modern thought being put on a historical context he will be largely shunned for his other works due to the era and time he grew up in. Largely not his fault. Moving on beyond the political time and situation, much of his short stories, personally, too short to delve into much, he should have made longer stories to be able to judge correctly what he is like and style.

Jan 30, Bob Newman rated it it was ok. This collection of stories about English life in India may have entranced the masses and sold a lot of newspapers in the first decade of the 20th century, but in the context of over a hundred years later, they have lost most of their shine.

While Kipling might have been the foremost raconteur of British India, compared to great short story writers like Chekhov, de Maupassant, or Twain, he comes across today as coy Yesterday's Fad, Today's Flat Beer I believe Kipling was wildly popular in his day. While Kipling might have been the foremost raconteur of British India, compared to great short story writers like Chekhov, de Maupassant, or Twain, he comes across today as coy and contrived.

Certain phrases make their appearance in far too many of the tales, for example: Kipling's stories may hold your interest for a short time and you can wonder at the change in taste that has occurred between , when he published these, and today. In many tales, Kipling depicts the lifestyle among the higher echelons of the British Raj, but only through a veil of irony or humor. A regular topic is the struggle for social status among the British; efforts to short circuit the pecking order and reversals suffered thereby.

People marrying "beneath them" or trying to marry "above them" are often found here. Though people still refer to Kipling as "a writer about India", it is still true that he wrote about his compatriots, not about India. The two or three tales with Indian characters who are anything other than servants lack any depth. Even the pathos-filled "Story of Muhammad Din", which shows understanding, ultimately deals with illness as something inevitable in Indiathere are no questions as to why death came to small Indian children so frequently.

Overall, Kipling provides a certain local color to British literature of the late 19th and early 20th century, but cannot be regarded as a great British writer on the level of Maugham, Conrad, Lawrence, Forster or Greene because he lacks broader humanity, deep thought, and universal vision. Mar 02, Shelby Abbott rated it it was amazing. Rudyard Kipling Plain Tales from the Hills was published in , and is a collection of fictional short stories.

Many of his works presented in this collection are humorous and seem to have some type of profound statement in each story. Many of the tales looked at the common life of common people, dealing with Rudyard Kipling Plain Tales from the Hills was published in , and is a collection of fictional short stories. Many of the tales looked at the common life of common people, dealing with arbitrary and trivial situations.

If the protagonist was a female, she was rebellious and outgoing. If the male, then they would typically have a power struggle to overcome.

Talk:Plain Tales from the Hills/The Gate of the Hundred Sorrows

Because of the absence of page numbers in my edition , I had the feeling the book was strictly for enjoyment, not for analysis. My attitude about of this book is overall very positive. It is an easy read that is very entertaining. I feel as if the purpose of the short stories collected in Plain Tales from the Hills can all be connected to the setting Kipling was surrounded by, Simla, British India. This place was a hill station and had a well established viceroy for the Indian government.

In many of his stories, a viceroy was mentioned to be the uppermost class such as a ruler of a small society , and usually had some conflict with a character from a lower class. When reading each individual story, there is usually a line or two that can be correlated to another story located in the book. Because Kipling was living in the late Victorian Era, of modernism and social reform, it is expected he would imply these new concepts to his stories.

The caste system which was very prominent in India, is an obvious principal to these tales. It is the contradicting mixtures Kipling incorporates within his characters, from imperialism and social equality to free-willed woman, that creates the challenge of imagining the smaller context that create the entirety of the stories, that a reader creates while reading most anything. When I first dove into Plain Tales from the Hills, I found the stories to be humorous with a clear plot, that makes this collection a very easy read.

Through out the tales, I found myself highlighting and marking quotes and lines I found to be relevant or simply a clever metaphor. Kipling does an expectedly good job at collaborating each story while keeping them all separate at the same time. I do not regret purchasing this book and would highly recommended it to others. Overall, I would consider this collection of tales to be timeless and constantly entertaining. Jan 18, Heidi rated it liked it Shelves: Wasn't a huge fan of this one, but the stories did entertain me at times.

Plain Tales from the Hills

I got a good perspective on what the culture of the British Raj looked like, from many different points-of-view, but it mainly leaned toward the British bias which makes sense, these stories being written by Kipling, as he does that. Overall, they humored me and it was a painless read for a schoolbook, but not something I would read in my leisure time. I did glean an understanding of the mistreatment of Indians in the tim Wasn't a huge fan of this one, but the stories did entertain me at times. I did glean an understanding of the mistreatment of Indians in the time, and was struck by Rudyard's dry humor, mixed with an air of "this is just the way things are" with the more tragic stories.

There's irony, but still something seems off socially and politically in this world, and I think that intrigued me because of how it's treated so oddly normal. The Gate of the Hundred Sorrows was Kipling's first story, so detailed notes on that one story will cover much of Plain Tales from the Hills.

No, he didn't - but he died more than 70 years ago which is enough for copyright to have lapsed. This might be checked with Kipling's estate and The Society of Authors. SteveBKK -- Steve I see how to write links in the script. Some of the points were already covered in the dictionary and in the encyclopedia. Plain Tales from the Hills. Kipling was fond of the double hyphen which has become a dash in more recent punctuation.

Should spelling and punctuation be updated to reflect modern custom and practice? Hi, we aim to faithfully reproduce an edition; usually it is the only edition that the contributor has available to them, or one that they prefer. We also add footnotes in the text to explain nuisances that they reader may not readily guess. Comments on talk pages are also a useful way of telling the readers more about the text. Plain Tales from the Hills " that the source used was the gutenberg edition, and these pages do look gutenberg-ish.

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Collected Stories Everyman's Library. Plain Tales from the Hills: By Rudyard Kipling - Illustrated. Selected Stories Penguin Classics.

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