Drawing the Veil

Drawing a veil over identity

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To conceal something, usually by not talking about it. Can we please draw a veil over that stupid rumor about me? It's not true, but I want as few people to hear. draw a veil over sth definition: If you draw a veil over a particular subject, you do not speak about it because it is unpleasant and you do not want to think about it: .

It is as though the time layered into these walls prompts remembrances of the passing of their own lives and encourages artists to pin them down before the memories disappear. Such an artist from East Africa would be Miriam Syowia Kyambi who captured the sun bleached walls of Mexico City in a series of collages and woodcuts.

Sketch: Drawing a veil over the burka ban

Another would be Beatrice Wanjiku, recently returned from a two month fellowship in the US, who has created her own peeling walls of remembrance. To do so, she has utilised a technique that is becoming a nervous tic among Kenyan artists… the dribbling of white paint down the canvas. Peer deeper and discover the secrets of my art. Be intrigued and mystified by my elusiveness, it seems to say.

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Current practitioners include Xavier Verhoest, who might have started the trend and Paul Onditi, as well as Wanjiku, who is currently showing some 16 pictures — 11 oils and five small collages — at the One-Off Gallery in Rosslyn, Nairobi. The show continues until February Other artists, noting the powerful effect of these accidental splashes, began to make them deliberately, but used them differently. But like all veils they offered the promise of eventual revelation. For that to work, it demanded the keeping of an unspoken covenant between artist and viewer: The artist had to offer something behind the gauze worth knowing, while the viewer had to accept that finding out what was there might take some time and effort.

Drawing a Veil (Wired Connect)

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It was never going to be an instant hit. East African exponents of added text are many, up to and including Peterson Kamwathi with his direct quotes from the new Constitution and Michael Soi, who uses headlines pasted onto the canvas to add surprise, wit and a sharp twist to his records of exploitation and depravity. Graffiti, the language of the street, has another useful function as well as evoking the restless vigour of the disaffected.

For writing has the happy effect of stitching together disparate elements on the picture surface. It is a link that binds the whole thing together.

About Drawing a Veil

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Drawing a Veil , please sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Jan 21, Alice rated it it was ok. The theme of this book is wonderful: However it is written in a very simple manner and it has quite a lot of unnecessary violence. I understand that it could be accessible to all children however, in my opinion, it lowers the bar on children's literature.

Sketch: Drawing a veil over the burka ban - Telegraph

An empowering story based on friendship, identity and standing up for individuality. The main character in this book is a girl called Amina and her best friend Ellie. Everyone takes notice and drop their jaws in shock when Amina walks in to school wearing hijab for the first time. Ellie is stunned to see this sudden change in her best friend and not long before she starts to feel confused and starts to question their friendship.

Amina during the course of the story stands up to a group of bullies only to find the same bullies in the park later on that evening.

Ellie, after contemplating weather she should meet Amina in the park or Carlie in the mall, she decides to pop in to the park first. Together they find themselves running from these bullies and eventually come in to a pathway where Ellie was able to share her concerns and fears, whilst strengthening their friendship.

This book is excellent, because it not only touches on a very controversial issue, but it also addresses misconceptions around this matter. The author clearly conveys that Amina might have drawn closer to her religion but it does not mean that she will change towards the people she is close to. This book is just as relevant for sub-urban out of London school children as it is for diverse inner city school children.

At a time of conflict, confusion and controversy I think these books are essential for inclusive education and to challenge stereotypes.

Dec 03, Den rated it really liked it Shelves: This book is an easy read but is about aspects of life common to many young people today. Ellie and Amina have been best friends forever but one day without telling her Amina turns up at school wearing a headscarf. Ellie feels that her religion might come between them. As you can imagine some of the pupils become hostile towards her and Ellie is caught up in this.

Will their friendship survive this? Ruth Thunderwhistle rated it liked it Jul 09, Joann Domingue rated it liked it Jun 23, Hazel rated it liked it Oct 21, Soumi Dey rated it liked it Jun 14, Sarah rated it liked it Feb 12, Highlandslibrary added it Feb 25, Chris Oakley added it Mar 04, Portland Place added it Feb 09, Emily marked it as to-read Aug 22, Sue Nash-skiner added it Sep 23,