The Child

Multiple Narratives Mean Non-Stop Action In 'The Child'

Coroner Paul Herzfeld finds a capsule in the head of a heavily mutilated corpse, containing a phone number and single word: A troubled man survives a suicide attempt. He calls an old friend to rescue him in the middle of the night. Their journey is just beginning, and by daybreak, a tragedy will surface. Defence attorney Robert Stern can scarcely believe his eyes when he meets with the mysterious client who has summoned him to a godforsaken industrial park.

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To his astonishment, the defendant is a ten-year-old boy, a fragile child with a chronic illness who insists that he was a murderer in a former life. Robert Stern's surprise turns into horror when he searches the cellar described by Simon and finds a human skeleton whose skull has been split by an axe. But this is only the beginning.

Simon tells him of other victims whose bodies have lain undiscovered for years. Suddenly, the present becomes murderously dangerous as well Written by Sebastian Fitzek. At first the movie takes a pretty serious turn, but then starts jumping back and forth as if not sure what tone to contain, so it just tone-shifts allover.

The ending is one big giant letdown, and the last act of the movie is just characters explaining the plot to the audience - which is not such a bad thing considering how confusing the film is due to its tone-shifting issues - although you can't help but keep expecting the phrase "And I would've gotten away with it if it wasn't for you meddling kids" to pop up. Don't waste your time on this one, watch 'Silence of the Lambs' instead. Visit Prime Video to explore more titles.

Return to Book Page. Preview — The Child by Fiona Barton. The Child Kate Waters, 2 3. When a paragraph in an evening newspaper reveals a decades-old tragedy, most readers barely give it a glance. For another, it reveals the dangerous possibility that her darkest secret is about to be discovered. Paperback , pages. Published December 14th by Corgi first published June 27th To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about The Child , please sign up. Is the story of 'The Child' in any way related to the story of 'The Widow'? The descriptions seem totally unrelated, but if not, do I have to or should I read 'The Widow' first? Nichole DirrtyH They share a common character, and there is a point in this book where that character references the events of that book, so if you plan on reading …more They share a common character, and there is a point in this book where that character references the events of that book, so if you plan on reading The Widow at some point, I would read it first because otherwise there are spoilers.

But you don't need to read it in order to read this one. I loved the Widow and just re-read it again, finding it even better the second time around - how is this one compared to that? I don't want to read the reviews and stumble across any spoilers. Betsy I am finding it a page turner. It features the same reporter and detective, and has the same twists, turns, and suspense. See all 9 questions about The Child…. Lists with This Book. When I saw The Child being promoted in a similar form this year, I decided to shut my eyes, close my ears, and go in blind.

I avoided all reviews, spoilers, media packets, et 3. I really liked the idea of having a familiar, reoccurring character with each book left as a standalone story. I think readers like myself who felt the previous book lacked a punch to the gut will be pleased with the way things are wrapped up here.

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Child abuse cases inch upward, minority children over-represented. Forty two years later a baby's skeleton is found by workmen on a building site in Howard Street. Really enjoyed my first Fiona Barton novel Alice's mother, Angela wants to believe it's Alice; Emma who was a teenage resident in Howard Street in the 80's is concerned a long buried secret could be about to be exposed and Kate Waters, a newspaper journalist hung up on the humanity side of the discovery of the bones, is determined to get to the truth of who the baby is by befriending both Angela and later Emma. Four POV's present multiple secrets and plenty of avenues for this mystery to go

Highly recommended to those who enjoy a slow burning psychological thriller with a seriously messed up ending. View all 33 comments. Dec 15, Miriam Smith rated it it was amazing Shelves: With a very intriguing start "The Child" by Fiona Barton is one of those books you won't be able to put down until your curiosity has been sated. This is an excellent example of a slow burning, suspenseful psychological thriller with an ending that I didn't see coming and was completely unexpected.

Judge: 'Disinformation' from nurse led to child being separated from mother

Baby Alice Irving goes missing from her maternity crib in hospital in Forty two years later a baby's skeleton is found by workmen on a building site in Howard Street. Alice's mother, Angela wants With a very intriguing start "The Child" by Fiona Barton is one of those books you won't be able to put down until your curiosity has been sated.

Alice's mother, Angela wants to believe it's Alice; Emma who was a teenage resident in Howard Street in the 80's is concerned a long buried secret could be about to be exposed and Kate Waters, a newspaper journalist hung up on the humanity side of the discovery of the bones, is determined to get to the truth of who the baby is by befriending both Angela and later Emma. Old memories resurface and it's not long before long buried secrets start to invade and destroy people's lives. Told from the point of view of the three women their stories intertwine perfectly and they seamlessly merge together in an intriguing and emotional conclusion.

I loved the 70's and 80's era that is covered in the story, being exactly the same age as Emma in the book at the time it is set I really felt a part of the story. All the main characters are just perfect, likeable and realistic, they really showed true emotion and were the type of characters you could relate to and understand their feelings. I like the authors writing style, it's easy to follow, entertaining, doesn't drag and truly keeps you compelled to keep reading.

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The Child has ratings and reviews. Chelsea said: STARS I was in the minority last year when Fiona Barton's The Widow was published; I. “Fiona Barton brings back reporter Kate Waters from the best-selling The Widow and delivers another winner with The Child. A truly engaging tale. The author of the stunning New York Times bestseller The Widow returns with a brand-new novel of twisting psychological suspense.

With an excellent attention to detail and staying sensitive to the delicate subject matter, this is a fabulously executed book that I thoroughly enjoyed. There's also some great quotes too in the narrative. This is the second book by Fiona Barton, the first one being "The Widow" and although newspaper reporter Kate Waters is in both stories, they are both individual standalones that can be enjoyed separately or together.

A well deserved 5 stars from me and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend or read more by this author again. When an old house is being demolished in London, the body of a small child is found buried. The story doesn't garner much attention at first, but journalist Kate Waters sees it and can't stop thinking about following up on it. As she begins to look into it a crime that happened decades ago is brought back to attention but things are more complicated than they appear at first. I personally didn't enjoy The Widow but I really enjoyed this one. I felt like the plot for the widow felt obvious and I When an old house is being demolished in London, the body of a small child is found buried.

I felt like the plot for the widow felt obvious and I wasn't surprised by it. This time though I really got into the plot line. I honestly had no clue where the story line was going and so I couldn't put it down.

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I really loved the characters here more as well, they were complicated but I didn't have any trouble empathizing with them. I also really enjoyed the way everything came together at the end and looking back I feel like I should have known what was going to happen. Even if I did though the way the plot unfolded and the pacing was so good that I think I would have enjoyed it none the less.

View all 3 comments. A traveling sister read with my Canadian sisters Norma and Brenda. This is one of my favorite styles of books. Multiple stories running parallel to one another until at some point they converge in an amazing, unpredictable way. This one absolutely lives up to that! That's the beauty of this book! Kept me on my toes and in the dark throughout most. If it wasn't for A traveling sister read with my Canadian sisters Norma and Brenda.

If it wasn't for my sisters guiding me I would have been left behind on this one! For our full traveling sister review please visit Norma and Brenda's fantastic book blog: View all 53 comments. I really enjoyed the Widow by Fiona Barton, so I was looking forward to her next mystery.

And I have no complaints. If not quite as good, it was still a very enjoyable mystery that I can heartily recommend. This is a fast paced mystery told from the perspective of four different women. Short punchy chapters keep this book moving right along. At first I was worried about keeping the women straight, but no problems there.

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I have to say I wasn't a fan of Jude, who struck me as a total narcissist. Emma, her daughter, has her issues, too. And I just felt sorry for Angela, whose baby daughter went missing from the maternity ward a day after her birth. What makes the novel work well is how the different stories all come together. The relationship between Emma and Jude was the real clincher to keeping my interest. I figured out what was happening well before Kate did. My thanks to netgalley and Berkley Publishing for an advance copy of this book. View all 6 comments. The Child' by Fiona Barton is a Berkley publication.

This novel centers on a missing child, in a way, but is more character driven, in my opinion. The atmosphere here is suspenseful, loaded with heavy emotions, and addictively readable.

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The short chapters, which normally, is a huge pet peeve of mine, worked in this case, keeping the pacing brisk and the alternate perspectives fresh The Child' by Fiona Barton is a Berkley publication. The short chapters, which normally, is a huge pet peeve of mine, worked in this case, keeping the pacing brisk and the alternate perspectives fresh.

This review is the copyrighted property of Night Owl Reviews. To read the full review, click on this link: View all 12 comments. But that didn't happen here! This follow-up was awesome! In a lot of ways, it reminded me of the follow-up to a blockbuster movie--you know, the ones where you can tell the studio was just rushing to churn the next one out to capitalize on the fanfare of the last one. Have you ever read a novel and just knew you could pick out the characters on the street if you saw them?

Their mannerisms are so real, their dialogue so witty, so poignant, so enthralling, that you recall a whole slew of their quotes from memory. These characters come alive on the page and delight you, make you want to be them—or at least kidnap them and keep them as your new bestie. One of the better aspects of this novel is that Barton uses the format of short chapters to swiftly draw her reader in and keep them turning pages. That technique makes the read seem shorter, faster, and is a true hallmark of the modern-day thriller, which was once again used brilliantly here.

Well, to an extent. Of all things, The Child was chalked full of filler. I could almost palpably feel myself ripping at the cotton-like filler to get down to the meat, the core of the novel. All I needed for complete this novel was a cuppa Earl Grey and a biscuit. Crying at the slightest stimulus. There were moments where I actually imagined them fawning and fanning themselves at the thought of these men, swooning in their own misery, and that made the read feel long, like I was trudging through used Kleenex the entire time.

These characters all needed a swift kick in the ass if you ask me. Hmm, and the ending. There were loads of other sections that could have been scrapped in favor of perfecting the ending, believe me—and the fact that the ending was held up by sappy, weak-willed characters just ruined it, like spilling liquid on a watercolor painting. Never read this authors first book either, but something about this book, the beautiful blue cover and the synopsis, enticed me enough to read.

When an old building is being demolished the bones of a newborn are found. Kate, a journalist, trying to hold on in the new world of internet news, finds something about this discovery that makes her want to find the truth behind the discovery. Her search will end up 3. Her search will end up involving three other women, each with a shocking story to tell. I really took to the character of Kate, her doggedness, and insights. Also liked how this story was laid out, alternating chapters between the characters, gives us a chance to follow right along as the story unfolds.

This format tends to work with thrillers quite well. Although I was ahead of Kate in her discoveries, kind of knew where this was going, it was still Interesting enough for me to keep going. Was suspenseful enough without being shocking or graphic, and there were enough side things going on to keep me turning the pages. Given the premise, I figured it would also be an emotional read, and it was that. The story is told in alternating perspectives of four women, the investigative reporter who we first met in THE WIDOW and three others whose lives will be upended by the discovery.

Could they be related? She sees the humanity in this story, and not just a sensationalized headline for her publication. I loved how all the pieces came together in this haunting family drama. I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The author Fiona Barton delivers again! Kate Waters is a journalist and the main character in this novel. She was also a character on the author's previous novel The Widow but you do not need to read it to be able to enjoy this book because the cases are completely unrelated.

Ok, back to the story. The body of a newborn baby is found buried in a neighborhood undergoing construction. The The author Fiona Barton delivers again! The story is told from several points of view and the characters are interesting and well-drawn. The novel takes place in England and is engaging. Overall I enjoyed the story and look forward to reading the author's next novel. View all 20 comments.

Many twists and turns with a surprise ending. She cobbles together a piece for her newspaper, but at a loss for answers, she can only pose a question: Who is the Building Site Baby? EMMA has secrets and works from home as a book editor. She is married to Paul a teacher at the University. Emma suffers from anxiety and is on medication. Angela never recovered from the trauma.

She had been a nurse and was now married to Nick, a stay-at-home mom with son, Patrick and daughter, Louise. Kate is fascinated with this story, and decides to try and uncover the story behind the remains.

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Jude along with Will threw Emma out of their house when she was just 16 years old. Only Will was important to her…not her daughter. Emma has tried to share her secret, but Jude would not listen. But all these women take notice of the newspaper article of the building site baby. Each short chapter is devoted to one of the above characters, to allow the reader to get to know all four characters in greater depth.

Her heartbroken parents were left devastated by the loss. The author of the stunning New York Times bestseller The Widow returns with a brand-new novel of twisting psychological suspense. As an old house is demolished in a gentrifying section of London, a workman discovers a tiny skeleton, buried for years. Who is the Building Site Baby? A truly engaging tale. So many questions, so much perfect suspense…. An engrossing, irresistible story about the coming to light of a long-buried secret and an absolutely fabulous read—I loved it! Buy the Audiobook Download: Apple Audible downpour eMusic audiobooks.

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Inspired by Your Browsing History. Author Fiona Barton on her writing career, and her early work Author Shorts.

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