Sky Coyote: A Company Novel (The Company)


Removed The Nogiku Series Book 1. To save her family and forge a new peace for her city, Sanaa has no choice but to risk her life for the human race. A gem amongst westernized sci-fi. I'm an illusionist, not a psychic.

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Going on TV is supposed to advance my career, but things go wrong. Like vampires and zombies kind of wrong French technologist Esquelle is watched by terrorist kidnappers, faces the threat of the Primary Key and more in this thrilling trilogy! It started with a stolen exosuit and a missing brother.

It's ending with a giant alien egg and The Apocalypse 2. Are you ready for a wild adventure? Kage Baker lives in Pismo Beach, California. The Company Book 2 Paperback: Tor Books; 1 edition November 27, Language: Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. The First Companion Android. Perfect novel for fans of Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Read reviews that mention sky coyote garden of iden kage baker company series native american new world time travel mendoza in hollywood book in the series immortal cyborgs takes place science fiction white men point of view main character company operatives next installment noble savages highly recommended looking forward.

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The year is , and the immortal agent named Joseph must convince a small tribe of California Indians to pack up and move. Zeus Company that employs Joseph resides in the 24th century, and they want the whole tribe - the people, their DNA, their artifacts, and their cultural knowledge. This is a tricky assignment, full of pitfalls, but Joseph isn't one of their lead facilitators for nothing.

He's like the most professional con-artist in history, and he even has his prodigy, Mendoza, along for the ride. Since my expectations were low, I wasn't disappointed at all. In fact, I thought the story moved along nicely, but what it lacked was that deep emotional entanglement that ripped my heart out In the Garden of Iden. The first book focused on newbie recruit Mendoza, but Sky Coyote tells the story from Joseph's perspective, and since he's nearly 20, years old, he's just about as jaded as a person can get.

He's lost most of his humanity by the time this story takes place in the early s, and he keeps his head down and does his job, going wherever the Company needs his special skills for manipulation and b. That's probably why the story lacks punch, because Joseph refuses to acknowledge his angst about the Company's policies. He won't even consider what will happen when all of the immortals catch up to the time when his bosses live in the 24th century.

The thing that I love about these stories is how they combine history and science fiction so effortlessly. It's a beautiful melding of these seemingly unrelated topics, and Ms. Baker's treatment in this series is so unique that I'll keep reading them, even when they don't knock me over like her first book did.

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Rapier wit developed as defense mechanism to deflect rage of larger and more powerful children who took offense at abrasive, condescending and arrogant personality in a sickly eight-year-old. Baker's treatment in this series is so unique that I'll keep reading them, even when they don't knock me over like her first book did. I loved it, particularly the respect for a non-European culture. Joseph's latest role is that of Sky Coyote , the trickster , the foolish one, the animal god of many Native American traditions. While I really liked the first book in Kage Baker's Company series, I thought this sequel was merely "cute" - I was more interested in the mysterious politics of the Company than I was in the endless scenes with the Native American tribe that Joseph and his fellow immortals were trying to preserve. Jun 02, Stephen rated it liked it.

One person found this helpful. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. Set nearly a half century later, this story finds Joseph newly reassigned to the hidden South American base where Mendoza has been quietly doing botany. After several weeks enjoying the amenities of this Company town, they depart for the field. Relocate the Native American Chumash tribe before their culture is contaminated by colonizing Europeans.

Both the main story and the background stories differ in tone from Baker's previous book. Joseph holds center stage as he impersonates Sky Coyote, a Chumash god who must persuade the commercially sophisticated villagers to prepare for a new life in the Company. There is a great deal of on-the-spot myth-making as Joseph builds a bridge between their current beliefs and the Company setting they must become comfortable with.

Humor abounds, from slapstick to subtle digs at our own culture.

This lightness contrasts with the darker discoveries we unearth about the Company. Many questions are raised with few satisfying answers.

How can tensions be resolved between experienced, immortal Company operatives and relatively field-inexperienced managers from the future? What has happened to all of those disgruntled operatives who have dropped out of sight? And why is there no information from the future beyond ? Some of the characters we meet in this book seem to know more than they say about these issues. My only criticism is that too many issues are wrapped up quickly by Joseph's narration in the final chapter. It's a minor flaw that does not diminish the overall enjoyment of the book.

See all 55 reviews. Most recent customer reviews. If you liked the first one in the Published 1 year ago. Published on June 1, Kage Baker's death was a great loss. Published on April 30, Kage Baker's first novel, In the Garden of Iden , was a smart, funny, top-drawer read. Fans will be happy to find out that Baker avoids a sophomore slump with Sky Coyote , the second novel of the Company, and another superbly witty and intelligent book. Baker switches focus in this sequel to Joseph, the immortal cyborg who rescued Iden 's heroine, Mendoza, from the dungeons of the Spanish Inquisition.

Joseph and Mendoza work for Dr.

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Zeus, otherwise known as the Company, a 24th-ce. Zeus, otherwise known as the Company, a 24th-century operation devoted to getting rich off the past. To accomplish this, the Company turns orphans and refugees from the past into super-smart, nigh invincible cyborgs and sends them on missions to save or hide precious paintings, cultural treasures, and genetic information useful to the future world. When European explorers are scheduled to arrive in the New World, the Company dismantles operations, and Joseph is sent to California in to save a Chumash village lock, stock, and barrel, before Europeans arrive with smallpox and slavery.

To prep the Native Americans for their voyage to a Company enclave in Australia, Joseph poses as Uncle Sky Coyote, a trickster-god of the Chumash, and tells them he's there to save them from certain doom at the hands of white men. But can Joseph convince the wary, savvy Chumash labor unions, lodges, and entrepreneurs that he has their best interests at heart, all without screwing up history?

And will he patch things up with Mendoza, who still hasn't forgiven him for everything that happened in s England? Kage Baker delivers a terrific story and a worthy sequel with Sky. Cunningly blending a pre-Columbian past with a 24th century extrapolated from every adult's nightmare about the younger generation, Baker's second installment in her Company series proves a witty match to In the Garden of Iden. There, cybernetically outfitted with fur and paws, he apotheosizes to the cannily entrepreneurial Chumash Indian tribe so he can collect them and their entire biosystem for Company studies in the remote future.

Joseph's Company is Baker's deliciously wicked platform for satirizing past, present and all-too-likely future human frailties. From sure-handed sendups of 24th-century Cinema Standard speech patterns and a dismayingly suggestive portrait of the Chumash Medical AssociationAstaring eyes, knotted hair and an air of too frequent consumption of alkaloidsAto the Company's sacred Greater Mission Statement, Baker nails her 20th-century targets: Kage Baker June 10, — January 31, was an American science fiction and fantasy writer.

She was born in Hollywood, California and lived there and in Pismo Beach most of her life. Before becoming a professional writer she spent many years in theater, including teaching Elizabethan English as a second language. She is best known for her "Company" series of historical time travel science fiction.

Her unusual first name pronounced like the word "cage" is a combination of the names of her two grandmothers, Kate and Genevieve. In , her short story "Caverns of Mystery" and her novel House of the Stag were both nominated for World Fantasy Awards, but neither piece won. In January , it was reported that Baker was seriously ill with cancer.

She died from uterine cancer at approximately 1: Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Sky Coyote by Kage Baker. Sky Coyote The Company, 2 3. Facilitator Joseph is quite a guy. He's sailed with the Phoenicians, and he's been an Egyptian priest, an Athenian politician, and secretary to a Roman senator. After all, his employer, the twenty-fourth-century Company, sends immortal cyborgs like Joseph all over the world and all over time.

But now Joseph finds himself in , in the Mayan jungle's Lost City actually a spa for the Company's operatives with his protegee, the Botanist Mendoza, who still hasn't forgiven him for that unfortunate incident in Elizabethan England. And he has to save an ancient people from encroachment by the coming white men -- even if it means convincing the entire pre-Columbian village to step into the future.

Paperback , pages. Published March 7th by Harper Voyager first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Sky Coyote , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Native American mythology made real! View all 5 comments.

Sky Coyote

Feb 05, Ryandake rated it it was amazing Shelves: Mendoza also tags along, although she's kind of a bit player in this novel. This second novel of the Company makes all of In the Garden of Iden feel like a prequel, and for those SF readers who don't like much romance I might recommend starting here. It jumps ahead a couple hundred years and switches to Joseph's first-person narrative I think the series is actually shaping up to switch back and forth between Mendoza and Joseph with every book, but I could be wrong , and it gets much more into the world-building that was so ruthlessly relegated to the background in the This second novel of the Company makes all of In the Garden of Iden feel like a prequel, and for those SF readers who don't like much romance I might recommend starting here.

It jumps ahead a couple hundred years and switches to Joseph's first-person narrative I think the series is actually shaping up to switch back and forth between Mendoza and Joseph with every book, but I could be wrong , and it gets much more into the world-building that was so ruthlessly relegated to the background in the first novel. There's still nothing ground-breaking about Baker's set-up, but the glimpses of the world of the future begin to have a more coherent if deliberately baffling look. Joseph is a delightful narrator, much wiser than Mendoza and less self-centered.

He also has already done his growing up way back in prehistory, as he was recruited somewhere around BC and thus doesn't subject the reader to all the "oh my god the world is not what I was led to believe! Instead, he is the sort of character that is settled in his comfortable rut and keeps his head down when the fur starts to fly. He knows he's playing ostrich, but over the millennia he's gotten glimpses of some nasty things, and he very much doesn't want to be the one turning over all those rocks. That, of course, makes him very human, no matter what Mendoza thinks of him.

And that, of course is the major theme Baker is exploring in this series -- our common humanity, no matter what outer trappings we set up to differentiate ourselves from each other. That theme is very much made manifest in Baker's portrayal of the Chumash, which I also found delightful. The jacket description doesn't do them justice. But though the Chumash serve as the focus of the plot, Sky Coyote is there for many of the same reason In the Garden of Iden was: To that end, in this novel we also meet our first humans from the future where Dr.

Zeus invented time travel and immortality treatments, that bright future that all the immortals living through history the long way are waiting to see, and their portrayal answers some of my questions and raises quite a few others. I was wondering, the entire time I was reading In the Garden of Iden, why on earth the Company didn't employ any adolescent psychologists who could tell them what the natural course of events would be given the way they raise their little immortal cyborgs I mean, anyone with a lick of common sense could tell what was going to happen, but I acknowledge that the Company would likely need to hear it from someone with a degree or two before acting on it ; now that I've seen some of the people who run the Company I understand why they didn't employ any adolescent psychologists.

But now I'm left to wonder how on earth those people even formed Dr. I will admit, this novel wears its narrative on its sleeve -- I can just hear Baker thinking things like "and I'll insert a flashback here because the plot's getting a bit slow and I need to put this in somewhere" -- but the narrative voice is strong enough that I don't mind.

And there is a moment, a single perfect moment, near the end of the novel p. That moment is the same sort of moment I saw in the short story I read by Baker that made me start talking her up as a favorite author; that moment would have made a much weaker book worth the price.

And the ending Baker gives Kenemekme is just as good, a wonderful bit of metaphysics and humanism that isn't overplayed like it could have been. I will definitely be continuing this series, though I'm a little worried I'm going to hate switching back to Mendoza's voice.

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May 06, Alex rated it it was ok. She Kage did it again, only this time worse. OK, I couldn't put down the book. That accounts for the extra star. First half was great. Lots of hints at character development, future power struggles, etc. Or maybe not, maybe in the next books we get some closure, some high feelings to admire. But who cares then. Joseph seems to be what one She Kage did it again, only this time worse. Joseph seems to be what one would expect to be from a lead character, again until the very end when he goes on being a spineless shell just because.

There's no consistency in the portrayal which, mind you, is done in 1st person, so not much room for inference there. I'm angry and it shows, right? It's probably not as bad as I write it, but I can't avoid it. Meanwhile, the third one puts us again in the shoes of Mendoza, and it's not looking good at all. I mean, her inner thoughts. Get a grip already, woman.

Jan 11, Carly rated it really liked it Shelves: Sky Coyote wins the prize as the first physical book I've read in over a year, and I regret nothing. It continues the saga of The Company, but this time, the story is told from the immortal Facilitator Joseph's perspective. In this case, the Company isn't satisfied with grabbing lost artefacts and to-be-extinct plants; they decide to take an entire Chumash village as well, and decide to send in an agent in the guise of the trickster god Sky Coyote to persuade the village to come along peacefully Sky Coyote wins the prize as the first physical book I've read in over a year, and I regret nothing.

In this case, the Company isn't satisfied with grabbing lost artefacts and to-be-extinct plants; they decide to take an entire Chumash village as well, and decide to send in an agent in the guise of the trickster god Sky Coyote to persuade the village to come along peacefully. It's a perfect role for Joseph. I find Joseph a far more appealing narrator--and character--than the unpleasant, immature, icy, self-righteous Mendoza. There's nothing I love better than a fast-talking crook with a heart of gold, and Joseph fits that label perfectly.

Plus, just in case you had any doubts, in this book, Mendoza takes the opportunity to prove just how humourless and unforgiving she can be. Joseph's narration is wry and appealing: Because I have a keen appreciation of the ludicrous. Also because I have no choice. Rather than the stilted pidgin dialogue all too common in the characterization of native peoples, the servant Mayans sound like reproachful Jeeveses and the Chumash voice their modern attitudes with modern slang. Sepawit, sluicing off ash with a basket of water, greeted me cheerfully.

We had quite a shaker! Khutash is very angry. She found out about Sun's white men last night," I told them. Is that what makes earthquakes? We thought they just get tired every now and then and bump into one another," Nutku explained.

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The whole plot is as bawdy and crazy as many of the coyote stories I've read, including an interlude that's basically one long wince penis joke. But then there are the larger plot arcs. It took me years to really give the series a try, partly because I find immortality depressing, and partly because the plotholes and paradoxes induced by time travel tend to make me cringe.

Certainly Baker's basic setup can't sustain much thought without falling apart, but all the same, I found myself fascinated by the drama of it. Immortality is gained only by shaking off mortality and much of humanity. These immortals are cyborgs, good little machines trained to do the Company's will, feared by the humans they serve.

They are told that their future holds great rewards, but if so, why don't they have any information after ? Why do all who question the Company disappear without a trace? The book is satisfyingly cynical, another indictment of extremism, a tired, jaded, humorous portrait of the tragically unchanging nature of humanity. Well, things do; we don't, which is part of the problem. View all 3 comments.

Aug 26, Ryan rated it it was amazing Shelves: Second book in the Company series; this one switches focus from Mendoza to Joseph, and in doing so gives us a more detailed look at the history of The Company and some of their past actions. At the same time, we are in the "present" of , where Joseph has to preserve a tribe of Chumash natives from being wiped out by other tribes and European conquerors. Once again, I'm really impressed with Baker's ability to develop character through voice - I feel like I've got a good feeling that I know w Second book in the Company series; this one switches focus from Mendoza to Joseph, and in doing so gives us a more detailed look at the history of The Company and some of their past actions.

Once again, I'm really impressed with Baker's ability to develop character through voice - I feel like I've got a good feeling that I know who Joseph is from listening to him talk, even when he's not talking about himself. When he is, though, he seems more self-aware than Mendoza was, too, which is nice - he describes himself at one point as a cross between Bugs Bunny and Phillip Marlowe, which is an excellent description.

Baker's characterization of the Chumash - that despite being Stone Age natives, they are people and therefore not really all that different from us - was well done, and their civilization seemed nicely fleshed out. Oddly, though, this seems to have been written like the end of Joseph's story, but having read later books in the series, I know it's not. While I really liked the first book in Kage Baker's Company series, I thought this sequel was merely "cute" - I was more interested in the mysterious politics of the Company than I was in the endless scenes with the Native American tribe that Joseph and his fellow immortals were trying to preserve.

Sky Coyote was much sillier in tone than In The Garden of Iden was; lots of unanswered questions about who was running the Company and to what end were posed, but most of the pages were spent discussi While I really liked the first book in Kage Baker's Company series, I thought this sequel was merely "cute" - I was more interested in the mysterious politics of the Company than I was in the endless scenes with the Native American tribe that Joseph and his fellow immortals were trying to preserve. Sky Coyote was much sillier in tone than In The Garden of Iden was; lots of unanswered questions about who was running the Company and to what end were posed, but most of the pages were spent discussing the coyote god's penis and the not-as-humorous-as-was-intended modern ways of the Chumash tribe.

Most reviews I've read, luckily, have said the rest of the series is better than this low point, so I'm looking forward to reading book 3, which I just picked up from the library. Jun 04, Isis rated it really liked it Shelves: Of course I am a sucker for time travel, so no surprise I liked this. The narrative voice is fantastic, wry and quirky and wise as only a 20, year old immortal can be. I loved the very modern-sounding primitive tribe I imagine this is the filtration through Joseph's modern sensibilities and the tale of Coyote and his penis had me laughing out loud.

Second in a series, I didn't pick up the first because this one looked more interesting to me and as though it could stand alone w Oh, what fun. Second in a series, I didn't pick up the first because this one looked more interesting to me and as though it could stand alone which it does. But I shall get the others next. Mar 26, Princessjay rated it it was ok Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. It was pretty good, and drew me to read this series. Yes, I know it's suppose to get better--plot-wise? First, I could not identify with any of the immortals. In general, these are people supposedly equipped with towering IQ, endless knowledge reserves, centuries to millennia of hands-on experience, and they have not developed any introspection or philosophy about their lives and what they do.

It's as though, having been estopped from aging, they were also estopped from emotional growth. Aside from the author's repeated mention of how this person came from Neanderthal stock, that person lived through rise and fall of Rome, they could have been culled from today's reality tv. Mendoza, especially, I find inexplicably touchy and annoying.

What reason has she to be so angry?! Eternal youth, endless intellect, saved from being burnt at the stake to a life of 24th Century privilege even as she traverse through History. Sounds like a good deal to me. Yes, yes, a few obligatory references here or there about how the Company regard them as virtual slaves, and her fatal love affair, blah blah. Compared to others in the novel--Budu, for example--these are minor complaints. Her constant and grating "cynicism" then comes off as entitled and spoilt.

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: Sky Coyote, Chapters | domaine-solitude.com

I also dislike how the mortals are portrayed. Mostly one-dimensional, always foolish, especially those from the 24th Century. It's one thing to have the immortal see mortals as inferior--but to have the mortals actually BE inferior as well just seem like missed opportunities for dramatic depth.

But I guess we don't read this series for depth? I'm often surprised when people mention that Sky Coyote is Kage Baker's weakest in the Company series. Admittedly, the first time I read this book I was unimpressed, I wanted to know more about Mendoza, not Joseph.