The Boy Who Knew Too Much: A Child Prodigy Volume 1a (The Boy Know Knew Too Much: A Child Prodigy)

Off the Charts: The Hidden Lives and Lessons of American Child Prodigies

The title fit with the writer's summarize of each the child prodigy's biography and how they far at a later age. Too bad there aren't more minority kids in certain chapters. There was one real woman who was a child prodigy. I think she came from a working class Black family when her mother taught her literacy skills since she believed in ed The title fit with the writer's summarize of each the child prodigy's biography and how they far at a later age.

I think she came from a working class Black family when her mother taught her literacy skills since she believed in education. She was quite young when she was able to read like at age 2 or 3, got so good in math and enrolled into college at age Ann Hulbert doesn't answer the question: How can parents successfully raise prodigy kids so they can succeed later in life?

How much can help their children to reach their potential without too much pressure or too much hands-off approach? In a few of the stories, I can gather that the prodigy kids who grew up successful in whatever field they are in because their parents provide them the right supports, encourage their hard work ethic and let their kids' fail to learn from their mistakes while making sure they have a childhood where they have freedom to enjoy themselves and able to relax.

There were a few prodigies who didn't get the supportive parents; however they had mentors and other supportive adults in their lives to help them with assistance and resources. When parents and children can have a positive relationship into adulthood with good communication, respect and unconditional love is a foundation of it all. Sep 16, Chris Waraksa rated it liked it. Hulbert chronicles the lives of some of America's more well known child prodigies. In the end, in her "Epilogue" she reviews what she found in reading about a century and more of prodigies and finds not much in terms of new insights or anything in the sense of a conclusion about her central theme of how parenting impacts the childhood and ultimate fate of child prodigies.

She does not claim any answer to the nature vs. Still, it was quite interesting to read about the lives of these child prodigies. Many of them disappointed those who trumpeted their early promise as they, like all of us, changed over time and had different ideas about how they wanted to live than their parents and society.

Along with such well-known prodigies as Bobbie Fisher and Shirley Temple, she discusses others that are less famous, at least to me. Probably the most interesting of all and one that I wish I knew more abut was Phillipa Schuyler, a contemporary of Shirley Temple born to a white mother from Texas and an African-American father journalist.

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I picked up this book after reading a very favorable review in the New Yorker. I have one adult PG friend who was a child actor and I don't think she would recommend it. Available for download now. In the end, in her "Epilogue" she reviews what she found in reading about a century and more of prodigies and finds not much in terms of new insights or anything in the sense of a conclusion about her central theme of how parenting impacts the childhood and ultimate fate of child prodigies. Audiences expect the slickness that a good film editor and director get out of a film star's performance - but the film star often doesn't have the skills to deliver in that way, on the stage, where there is nothing but him or her and the character to hand. Still, it was quite interesting to read about the lives of these child prodigies.

She was a prodigious pianist who gave up the piano as a young woman to pursue journalism and died in a helicopter crash while covering an orphan airlift in Vietnam. In this book each chapter has its own interest, though it is not the kind of book that leaves you with satisfying answers. One sort of is left with the sense that the great talent of prodigies rarely proves to be a key to happiness. Oct 11, SundayAtDusk rated it really liked it Shelves: Author Ann Hulbert looks at American child prodigies in her book, focusing sharply on their relationship with their parents; as well as on their education and training, or lack thereof; and what became of them as adults.

She stresses in her Prologue that she is trying to tell the stories of the prodigies in an unsentimental and unsensational way. She stresses in her Epilogue that obviously predictions about prodigies, both good and bad, often don't come true. Some of the children included are No Author Ann Hulbert looks at American child prodigies in her book, focusing sharply on their relationship with their parents; as well as on their education and training, or lack thereof; and what became of them as adults.

Hulbert explores topics like IQ testing and Lewis Terman's work. This was due to those chapters seeming more cluttered than the rest, as well as personally having little interest in computer prodigies; having read more interesting things on savants, notably Darold Treffert's Islands of Genius: I think that last chapter on tiger parents should have been the third or second from the last chapter. Certainly other readers will find those last three chapters, in the order they occurred, far more interesting than I did, though.

But I do believe Ms. Hulbert should have stuck with prodigies who did not have severe disabilities, because that is really a whole different topic. For those interested in the possible metaphysical aspects of prodigies, there is no talk at all about reincarnation. However, someone did suggest back in the s that one of the child writers was possibly a medium, apparently transcribing the words of a deceased adult writer.

Feb 07, Kristine rated it liked it Shelves: Hulbert's experiences with child musicians in L. Apr 24, Jim rated it really liked it. Dipped into this because I wanted to know what constitutes the truly brilliant from the merely smart. It seems to be the drive, the need, the compulsion to perform in one area: I also was curious about the success-in-life of these early achievers and performers. It was not inevitable either in terms of satisfaction or hyper-achievement.

They had early potential that didn't deliver. Third, my curiosity about how to foster talent was also piqued by the books title. Generally, it wa Dipped into this because I wanted to know what constitutes the truly brilliant from the merely smart. Generally, it was the same as for all children, but was more difficult because of the need for lots of nourishment for these children as well as the potential for damage because of pressure on the children either from peers, parents, or others.

Some of the current high-performers we know from business are included, and that is very interesting because the environment was so supportive in some ways for their performances and achievement. Very interesting, but not conclusive in most ways.

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Jan 22, Sam rated it really liked it. Full disclosure I received this book from the publisher. I really liked the way the author chose prodigies in many different subject areas - not just math and science. In fact, I found the sections on musical prodigies to be some of the most interesting. As a jazz fan I loved that an autistic child could find an outlet in the music.

I think parts of the book would have been more interesting if I was a parent because at times I found myself wanting a little more information on the kids' talents a Full disclosure I received this book from the publisher.

The Boy Who Knew Too Much Movie (Development)

I think parts of the book would have been more interesting if I was a parent because at times I found myself wanting a little more information on the kids' talents and less on the parenting, but I realize that was supposed to be the focus of the book and the author did a good job of addressing parenting. Overall a very worthwhile read for anyone interested in prodigies or in being a better parent. Jun 21, Rita Ciresi rated it really liked it. What did chess grandmaster Bobby Fischer have in common with child star Shirley Temple? What do musical prodigies have in common with autistic savants?

The book reads more like a series of short biographies than an analysis. Of particular interest to me were the chapters on young female literary prodigies of yore whose work has now fallen into obscurity and the stories of pianists Lang Lang and Mark Yu. Feb 24, Chris rated it liked it. The first chapter was a stab at history As my grad school adviser said ,"proving what happened is hard, people forget and have biases. The book warms up with the descriptions of Spassky and company.

First person descriptions of current geniuses are tricky Distance from the subject can get in the way of objective analysis. The book comes across as a slide show instead of statistics On another no The first chapter was a stab at history As my grad school adviser said ,"proving what happened is hard, people forget and have biases.

The book comes across as a slide show instead of statistics On another note, so true, chess an ethnic game, so likely to wander into an eastern European immigrant's home and see the game going on the table. Feb 18, Lynn rated it liked it. Thisis an interesting examination of the lives of various types of child prodigies. The author gives vignettes of their lives but I never really felt she explored much deeper than that The sad part of what she tells is that at least half of her subjects end up with fairly miserable and compromised lives. Worse for me was the unspoken tale of the thousands of other kids who were equally gifted, equally driven and ended up in secon Thisis an interesting examination of the lives of various types of child prodigies.

Worse for me was the unspoken tale of the thousands of other kids who were equally gifted, equally driven and ended up in second place. Jun 24, Linda Wallace rated it it was ok. Like many other reviewers, I also cchose to read this book because of a favorable review.

It read more like a text book that I had to plow through. There was some interesting information along the way , but I found the writing style difficult. I felt that much of the narrative focused on the parenting styles and not so much on the children. Hulbert did present a historical background on prodigies, but this was not what I expected. I do not feel she fulfill the subtitle's claim of revealing the h Like many other reviewers, I also cchose to read this book because of a favorable review. I do not feel she fulfill the subtitle's claim of revealing the hidden lives and lessons of these children.

Mar 15, Jeremy rated it it was ok. I thought a book like this would be interesting, and it was at times, but it really didn't tell a comprehensive story and I was left wondering what the point was. We took a look into the lives and upbringing of people who were child prodigies. My biggest takeaway is life for child prodigies was difficult.

They were often pushed to an extreme extent by their parents and ended up with many family issues more than the normal amount I guess! They were often unhappy, as children and adults. Somewh I thought a book like this would be interesting, and it was at times, but it really didn't tell a comprehensive story and I was left wondering what the point was. Somewhat interesting, but probably not worth the time. Feb 25, Mary Thompson rated it it was ok Shelves: I do not recommend the audio edition.

The narrator uses a bizarrely sarcastic and mocking tone that denigrates the many child subjects of the book. It was hard to tell how much of this was coming from the text itself and how much was being read into it by the tone of the narration.

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  • On Children in Classical Music!
  • Real Reality?

At times it sounded like the author was ridiculing the subjects who failed to achieve success later in life and trashing their work. There was a lot of interesting information about the various subjects but not enough I do not recommend the audio edition. There was a lot of interesting information about the various subjects but not enough about the details of their adult lives to help us understand their later careers.

Mar 09, Pam rated it it was ok Shelves: I heard the author speak about this book and expected something totally different than what I found. This book is very historical telling the stories about prodigies in the past and up to the current time. I found the writing very dry, the individual's stories are told in a clinical way. I finally stopped part way through as the book was tedious and was not addressing any of the questions I had.

As a relatively new parent, this book - more than that garbage Grit by Duckworth or horrendous Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Chua - has given me more food for thought about how to approach my own bright, but not prodigious child's upbringing. This deep look into the very different paths of a broad spectrum of prodigies and their relationships with their parents, peers and mentors holds valuable lessons for all parents.

Jun 14, Lisa rated it it was ok. I picked up this book after reading a very favorable review in the New Yorker. I have to say that it didn't live up to my expectations. It just felt like a compilation of biographies but didn't include much analysis or commentary.

Monday, June 11, 2007

I'd recommend picking up one of those books instead. Feb 19, Susan rated it liked it.

Thursday, November 09, 2006

I was looking for more of an over-arching umbrella, and less minute-by-minute detail. This book read like a text book. Very detailed, but each bio seemed to be a mass of data with no wrap-up. Not much stuck with me after reading. However, people's lives are likely to not have a straight path, so perhaps that is the reason. Apr 12, Nancy rated it it was ok Shelves: This book is a series of mini-biographies of people who did very well at something as children music, chess, math, acting. I kind of skipped around in the book so maybe I missed the part that tied it all together.

The best thing about the book was getting interested in Shirley Temple and watching clips of her on youtube.

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